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Posts Tagged ‘World War II’

A World War II living history program in Kure Beach, a duel re-enactment in New Bern and the closing of an exhibit on the Tar Heel State and film are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend across North Carolina.

Here are eight things on our weekend agenda:

1. See World War II history come alive in celebration of V-J Day Saturday and Sunday at Fort Fisher in Kure Beach.

 

 

2. Visit the Starring North Carolina! exhibit at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh before it closes Monday.

 

 

3. See historic interpreters portraying John Stanley and Richard Dobbs Spaight re-enact the legendary 1802 duel between the two men at Tryon Palace Saturday in New Bern.

 

 

4. Enjoy old-time music, dancing, and food along the banks of the Yadkin River at the Happy Valley Fiddlers Convention in Lenoir throughout the weekend.

 

 

5. End your summer with a bang at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort‘s annual murder mystery dinner Friday.

 

 

6. Watch Guardians of the Galaxy under the stars at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh Saturday.

 

 

7. Hear about one of the most dramatic rescues off the North Carolina coast during World War I at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras.

 

 

8. Celebrate the first Friday of September at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh with food and beer tastings and a telling of the hidden stories of some of North Carolina’s abandoned places, told by the filmmakers and photographers who document them.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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The kick off to a 166-mile commemorative walk in New Bern, a celebration of National Train Day complete with a bouncy house in Spencer and the chance to meet figures from North Carolina’s Civil War history in Raleigh are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are 15 suggestions to help you make the most of your time:

1. Hear about New Bern during the Civil War and wish a re-enactor well as he sets off for a 166-mile walk across North Carolina from Tryon Palace Sunday.

 

 

2. Meet figures from North Carolina’s Civil War history when a period camp comes to life on the grounds of the State Capitol in Raleigh Saturday.

 

 

3. Explore the often-overlooked World War II history of Kure Beach‘s Fort Fisher Saturday,when the site comes alive with period re-enactors and displays artifacts from the conflict.

 

 

4. Celebrate National Train Day Saturday with special train rides, tours, crafts and living history demonstrations at the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer.

 

 

5. Join Roanoke Island Festival Park in Manteo for a day of fun featuring face painting, blocks and bubbles, ice cream, art making and more Friday.

 

 

6. Remember the sacrifice made by British sailors off the coast of North Carolina at War Grave Ceremonies organized by the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum Thursday in Buxton and Friday in Oracoke.

 

 

7. Have tea and cakes after taking a special tour of the John Wright Stanly House to celebrate Mother’s Day Sunday at Tryon Palace in New Bern.

 

 

8. Spend your Saturday celebrating historic preservation with the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh by talking with experts who have helped save North Carolina’s treasures and checking out the museum’s Rural Revival exhibition.

 

 

9. Learn how to weave a pine needle basket Sunday at Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead.

 

 

10. See the Shakespeare classic A Midsummer Night’s Dream performed by students from the UNC School of Arts with the music of the N.C. Symphony in the background Thursday inChapel Hill and Friday and Saturday in Raleigh.

 

 

11. Take a walk through the park at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh Saturday, and thenmake sketches of what you saw with your kids.

 

 

12. Hear about some of the ways commerce affects art during a talk Thursday at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem.

 

 

13. Discover the history of music during the Civil War Saturday at the Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville.

 

 

14. Make a time capsule with your kids at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh Saturday.

 

 

15. Create your own Mother’s Day tour of N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh Sunday by browsing some of the museum’s works related to motherhood.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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Stop by the N.C. Museum of History Saturday to see artifacts from bluegrass legends on display and make a banjo of your own.

Toy banjo making in Raleigh, a drama depicting the Lincolns in Creswell and a boat building class in Beaufort are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The fun and learning start Thursday, when the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort hosts a lunchtime talk on the Native Americans that called the Crystal Coast region home. Friday, the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will screen the French drama Max et les Ferrailleurs as part of its fall film noir series and stay open late to let visitors explore the galleries at night with the smooth jazz stylings of the Oynx Club Boys in the background.

Saturday, the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh will help kids and families make a toy banjo to take home, while the N.C. Museum of Art offers a lecture exploring the genius of Vermeer across town. Elsewhere in Piedmont, Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead will open a traveling exhibit of treasures from Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge.

In the eastern part of the state, the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington will explore how World War II sailors coped with torpedo damage, while Historic Edenton offers another installment of its popular yoga classes on the 1767 Chowan County Courthouse lawn. In Hatteras, the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum will offer a day for prospective volunteers to see how they can help, while in Creswell, Somerset Place will present a drama depicting the last day of Abraham Lincoln’s life, including the opportunity for visitors to talk with re-enactors portraying Lincoln and his wife. The N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort will teach visitors how to build a boat using old-school carpentry techniques, while the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City puts on a bonsai workshop and hosts a lecture on U-boat action off the Outer Banks during World War II.

The weekend fun wraps up Sunday when the N.C. Museum of History presents a concert featuring the eclectic sounds of Dark Water Rising and the N.C. Museum of Art offers free, family-friendly art-making activities and gallery games with its pop-up art cart.

Throughout the weekend, the N.C. Symphony will perform concerts of music that captures the spirit and feel of Mexico in Raleigh.

Keep in mind, too, that next Tuesday is Veterans Day. Though most of our venues will be closed for the holiday, Tryon Palace in New Bern, the Battleship North Carolina inWilmington and the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will be open for family fun. Tryon Palace will offer a special salute to the men and women who have defended North Carolinathroughout history, while the N.C. Museum of Art will give free admission to its Small Treasures exhibition for veterans, active duty military members and their families.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend! If you know someone who’d like to receive these emails, they can sign up on the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources website.

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Tryon Palace will host the N.C. Symphony for a free concert
on its South Lawn Sunday. Don’t miss it!

Civil War cannon demonstrations in Fayetteville, a free symphony performance in New Bern and a Renaissance Fair in Raleigh are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The weekend kicks off Thursday morning when staff from the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh will read kids a tall tale after taking a short tour of one of the museum’s wonderful galleries.

Friday, the fun for families continues at the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City, where kids can create a collage inspired by the beach. In the evening, the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will offer visitors the chance to explore its galleries at night against the backdrop of the smooth jazz sounds of Peter Lamb and the Wolves and host a lecture on printmaking and art of Mexican American and Latino artists that complements their dynamic exhibit.

Cannon firing demonstrations will blast off from Fayetteville‘s Arsenal Park Saturday as the Museum of the Cape Fear explores the lesser-known aspects of the Civil War during a living history program, while the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington will come alive with living historians demonstrating what life was like aboard the vessel during World War II.

Sunday, the N.C. Museum of Art will offer merriment, music, games, traditional craft demonstrations and art-making activities for all ages as part of its fanciful Renaissance Fair, while Tryon Palace in New Bern will host its annual free N.C. Symphony concert on the picturesque South Lawn.

Throughout the weekend, the spectacular N.C. Symphony will present concerts of the powerful piece Carmina Burana in Chapel Hill and Raleigh, while the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer will host unique steam locomotives from the 1930s, 40s and 50s for a special four-day festival complete with daytime portraits, special operations, nighttime photos and more.

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A celebration of springtime on the farm in Pinnacle, an arts and history festival in Bath and the first in a series of readings by writers in Asheville are just a few of the opportunities for fun and learning you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The weekend kicks off Thursday morning when the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh hosts preschoolers and parents for an exploration of movement in art with a tour and interactive craft. Across town, staff from the N.C. Museum of History will read kids a tall tale after taking a short tour of one of the museum’s galleries. In the evening, Aycock Birthplace in Fremont will screen the 1954 nautical classic Long John Silver, while New Bern’s Tryon Palace will present stories, music and poetry in the West African Griot tradition.

Blackbeard the Pirate will be just one of many special guests at this year’s Bath Fest

Friday, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem will offer the chance to visit the museum late-night and see a “Cartoon Noir” film, while the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will let visitors explore the galleries at night with jazz stylings of Sidecar Social Club in the background.

Saturday, Historic Bath will offer craft vendors, music, food booths, free historic home tours, children’s activities (including a pirate costume contest!) and special genealogy project help as part of Bath Fest, and, as is traditional, the site will host the annual Cut-Throat Croquet Tournament to benefit scholarships at the same time.  Elsewhere on the coast, the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington will offer special tours that highlight the electrical, armor and other systems that made the ship work, while the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City will have hands-on activities, pony rides and the chance to see agriculture-related artifacts as part of its Potato Festival.

In the Triangle, the N.C. Museum of History will help kids and families make World War II solider badges after visits to the museum’s military gallery and explore what foods made it from Lebanon to North Carolina and why, as part of the museum’s Cedars in the Pines exhibit.

In the west, trucks from across history will take over the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer for an antique truck show, while basket making, children’s games, food and antique farm equipment displays will be just part of the fun at Horne Creek Farm’s Heritage Day in PinnacleAsheville‘s Thomas Wolfe Memorial will kick off its Writers at Wolfe series with a reading by nationally-acclaimed author Robert Morgan.

The weekend wraps up Sunday with a concert by the Triangle Youth Jazz Ensemble at the N.C. Museum of History, and throughout the weekend, the N.C. Symphony will perform the music of Disney’s Fantasia in Raleigh as the film plays in the background.

Check out our calendar for more on these and other events, and enjoy a great North Carolina weekend! You can also sign up on our website to receive information about our events in your inbox.

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An image of Whitlow from the N.C. Museum of History

An image of Whitlow from the N.C. Museum of History

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina women’s history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit on the women of our state’s past.

The Whitlow family of Leasburg in Caswell County saw six of their twelve children—four sons and two daughters—in military service during World War II. Evelyn B. Whitlow was the first of the family to join the military.

In May 1940 she joined the Army Nurse Corps (ANC) as a second lieutenant. Whitlow was serving as a nurse in the Philippines when Pearl Harbor was attacked on December 7, 1941. She was among the 77 army and navy nurses captured following the fall of the Philippines in May 1942. Known as the Angels of Bataan and Corregidor, these nurses were the first group of American women taken as prisoners of war.

For three years she remained in Santo Thomas, a Japanese internment camp outside Manila, until being liberated in February 1945. After the war she left the ANC, married a fellow POW from Santo Thomas, and moved to California. Whitlow died at the age of 78 in 1994.

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All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit from our state’s African American’s past.

Montford Point Marines. Image from the Southern Historical Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill

Montford Point Marines. Image from the Southern Historical Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill

Although a few blacks had served in the Continental Marines during the Revolution, the U.S. Marine Corps was strictly white-only until 1941. That year, President Franklin Roosevelt issued an executive order allowing for all races to participate in all branches of the military in segregated units.

The Marine Corps responded by opening Montford Point Camp in April 1942. Part of Camp Lejeune, the facility was specifically for the training of black recruits. At a cost of $750,000, the Corps constructed barracks and support facilities such as a motor pool, chapel, mess hall, steam plant and recreational area. In the era of strict segregation, interaction between white and black Marines during training was practically nonexistent.

Nearly 20,000 black Marines, all from Montford Point, served in World War II. Eleven ammunition and 51 depot companies saw action during the war, and the 51st and 52nd Defense Battalions were dispatched to the Pacific but saw no combat.

President Harry Truman’s 1948 Executive Order 9981 ended segregation in the U.S. armed forces. In June 2012 the Montford Point Marines were recognized for their service with the Congressional Gold Medal.

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