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Posts Tagged ‘Wilson’

The snow is falling outside, and on day like this we can’t resist browsing our collections and taking a look at how the people of yesteryear celebrated (or coped with, depending on your viewpoint) winter weather.

Here are six stand out snowy shots from our collections:

1. Two men standing next to a 12-foot snowbank somewhere in western North Carolina, circa 1960. (Image from the N.C. Museum of History).

 

1960-chevy-snowbank

 

2. This icy cover from a February 1951 issue of Our State Magazine. (Image from the State Library).

 

Our-State-1951

 

3. Celebrating the 1940 Easter snowfall in downtown Cary. (Image from the State Archives).

 

 

4. An aerial view of downtown Raleigh covered in snow, circa 1960. (Image from the State Archives).

 

 

5. Plowing U.S. 301 near Wilson, sometime in the 1920s or 30s. (Image from the N.C. Museum of History).

 

Plowing-1920

 

6. Gov. Luther Hodges and others talking in front a Fort Bragg based-airplane with snow-capped mountains in the background.

 

Hodges-Bragg-Mtns-1960

 

Looking to browse our collections yourself? Check out this list of 5 digital resources we offer for suggestions on where to start.

And don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to see more awesome photos like these year-round!

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BB&T Wilson Market President Wes Berry;  Jenny Moore, project manager of the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park Project (VSWGPP); Secretary Susan Kluttz; Wilson Mayor Bruce Rose; Henry Walston, chairman of the VSWGPP Steering Committee; Betty Ray McCain, former Cultural Resources secretary and member of the VSWGPP steering committee

BB&T Wilson Market President Wes Berry; Jenny Moore, project
manager of the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park Project (VSWGPP); Secretary Susan Kluttz; Wilson Mayor Bruce Rose; Henry Walston, chairman of the VSWGPP Steering Committee; Betty Ray McCain, former Cultural Resources secretary and member of the VSWGPP steering committee

A favorite project of many, including Secretary Susan Kluttz, is the Whirligig Park being constructed in downtown Wilson in honor of artist Vollis Simpson. It’s a great example of how art can be a spark to jumpstart the economy and redefine a community. “It’s a model for an art-driven economy,” says Sec. Kluttz. An example she uses as she travels across the state to speak to other towns who have seen furniture, mills and tobacco leave a void and are finding that arts and historic preservation can lead to a downtown renaissance, more jobs and new opportunities.

At the groundbreaking breakfast, BB&T market president Wes Berry announced a $100,000 pledge from the bank and presented a $50,000 check for the first installment with the second to come in October 2014.

Whirligigs are being installed for the dedication on Friday, Nov. 1, at 10 am to kick off the Whirligig Festival on Nov. 2 and 3. Great job, Wilson!

See more photos from the ground breaking here.

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Cultural Resources Sec. Susan Kluttz and her entire staff were saddened to hear of the loss of artist Vollis Simpson over the weekend. She wishes to share the following thoughts:

Born and bred in North Carolina, Vollis Simpson is a unique example of the vibrancy and creativity of North Carolina’s artists. A farm mechanic by trade, Vollis used his mechanical skills to create inspired and distinctive works of art.

Not out to make a name for himself, he didn’t even consider himself an artist when he first started practicing his craft. Late in life, he connected with the artist within himself and was able to make his vision a reality for all of us to enjoy.

Vollis combined his years of experience in moving houses and fixing machinery and his heart-felt patriotism to transform unused materials into magical machines that touched the child’s heart in each of us. His soaring sculptures have amazed onlookers for decades, and his work promises to inspire North Carolina artists for generations to come.

The whirligig at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

Our department has been fortunate to have many connections with Vollis—he was the winner of the 2011 North Carolina Award, one of his works is on permanent display at the N.C. Museum of Art and the N.C. Arts Council has been instrumental in establishing the Vollis Simpson Whirligig Park in Wilson. We are honored to have been able to help support such an outstanding artist.

My thoughts and prayers are with his family.

For more on Simpson’s life and work, check out his biography from the 2011 North Carolina Awards on the blog of the N.C. Arts Council. 

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Secretary Susan Kluttz on a horse-drawn plow at Aycock Birthplace. Photo by Gray Whitley from The Wilson Times.

Secretary Susan Kluttz on a horse-drawn plow at Aycock Birthplace. Photo by Gray Whitley from The Wilson Times.

Plowing, dying and cooking over an open fire were just a few of historical activities Cultural Resources senior staff observed last late week on their visit to the Gov. Charles B. Aycock Birthplace in Fremont. The visit coincided with site’s Farm Heritage Days program, which gave local school kids the opportunity to experience life during the 19th century over four days.

Sec. Kluttz and former Cultural Resources Sec. Betty Ray McCain

Sec. Kluttz and former Cultural Resources Sec. Betty Ray McCain

The Cultural Resources team, composed of Secretary Susan Kluttz, Chief Deputy Secretary Karin Cochran, Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry, Historic Sites Director Keith Hardison, Historic Sites Deputy Director Dale Coates and Historic Sites Eastern Regional Supervisor Jeff Bockert, began their visit by meeting with local supporters of the site, including former Cultural Resources Secretary Betty Ray McCain.

After hearing concerns from local supporters and site manager Leigh Strickland over the Aycock’s possible dormancy, Sec. Kluttz emphasized that it would it only be temporary and that every division of the department and state government had to sacrifice in these difficult economic times.

“It’s not that we don’t love this place and every other place in this department,” Sec. Kluttz said.

Kluttz then joined local children in an 1893 one-room schoolhouse for a lesson led by Historic Sites Curator of Education Jann Brown. During the lesson, Brown had a dunce cap and a blue back speller—two items that would’ve been common in classrooms of the time.

Sec. Kluttz with Cultural Resources staff members Karin Cochran, Kevin Cherry, Leigh Strickland, Keith Hardison and Jeff Bockert

Sec. Kluttz with Cultural Resources staff members Karin Cochran, Keith Hardison, Leigh Strickland, Dale Coats and Jeff Bockert

The schoolhouse has special significance at Aycock Birthplace, since Charles B. Aycock is frequently called the “education governor” for his dramatic expansion of the state’s public school system. In fact, he is credited with building one school for each day he was in office. When you consider that he served for one four-year term that means he was responsible for the construction of nearly 1,500 schools! Sec. Kluttz noted that the site and the department continue that legacy today.

“Education is the center of everything we do at Cultural Resources,” she said.

Check out more images of the visit here.

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