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Posts Tagged ‘Western North Carolina’

The snow is falling outside, and on day like this we can’t resist browsing our collections and taking a look at how the people of yesteryear celebrated (or coped with, depending on your viewpoint) winter weather.

Here are six stand out snowy shots from our collections:

1. Two men standing next to a 12-foot snowbank somewhere in western North Carolina, circa 1960. (Image from the N.C. Museum of History).

 

1960-chevy-snowbank

 

2. This icy cover from a February 1951 issue of Our State Magazine. (Image from the State Library).

 

Our-State-1951

 

3. Celebrating the 1940 Easter snowfall in downtown Cary. (Image from the State Archives).

 

 

4. An aerial view of downtown Raleigh covered in snow, circa 1960. (Image from the State Archives).

 

 

5. Plowing U.S. 301 near Wilson, sometime in the 1920s or 30s. (Image from the N.C. Museum of History).

 

Plowing-1920

 

6. Gov. Luther Hodges and others talking in front a Fort Bragg based-airplane with snow-capped mountains in the background.

 

Hodges-Bragg-Mtns-1960

 

Looking to browse our collections yourself? Check out this list of 5 digital resources we offer for suggestions on where to start.

And don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to see more awesome photos like these year-round!

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Step into the past Saturday at the Mountain Gateway Museum's Pioneer Day

Step into the past Saturday at the Mountain Gateway Museum’s Pioneer Day

A street festival in Old Fort, an exploration of Stonewall Jackson’s final days in Fayetteville and a preview of the stock car racing season in Elizabeth City are just a few of the fun events you’ll find from the mountains to the coast this weekend at the historic sites and museums of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The weekend fun starts later this evening as the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem hosts its annual spring fundraising gala, and the Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville presents an exploration of Stonewall Jackson’s final days.

Friday, Aycock Birthplace in Fremont will feature costumed interpreters and hands-on activities to help kids see what 19th century farm life was like, while the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort will give visitors the chance to kayak through local salt marshes. Historic Edenton will also offer the final installments of its science-themed tours, and the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer will host special programming for home school families.

Saturday will bring opportunities for family fun across the state. On the coast, the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City will show off local race cars right outside its doors, and Roanoke Island Festival Park in Manteo will present two performances of a children’s comedy show.  Visitors to Historic Bath will also have the opportunity to learn about gravestones, specifically how to use them in genealogy and preserve them.

Farther west, the Thomas Wolfe Memorial in Asheville will hold a short story writing contest for kids focusing on the Civil War as a theme. The Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort will also host a community-wide street celebration which will include craft vendors, food, face painting, heritage craft displays and an auto show with more than 400 classic cars.

The weekend wraps up Sunday with a lecture on the role of music during the Civil War at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh. Throughout the weekend, the N.C. Symphony will play concerts of Tchaikovsky and Haydn in Raleigh and Chapel Hill.

This weekend is also your last chance to check out two great exhibits. Al Norte al Norte: Latino Life in North Carolina and Leading the State: North Carolina’s Governors, both at the N.C. Museum of History, will close on Sunday.

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From left to right, the Mayor of Weaverville Al Root, state Rep. Michele Presnell, Sec. Susan Kluttz, Mayor of Asheville Terry Bellamy and state Reps. Nathan Ramsey and Joe Sam Queen.

From left to right, the Mayor of Weaverville Al Root, state Rep. Michele Presnell, Sec. Susan Kluttz, Mayor of Asheville Terry Bellamy and state Reps. Nathan Ramsey and Joe Sam Queen.

It was log cabins and frontier forts with a dash of literary history for the Department of Cultural Resources senior staff last week.

Last Thursday and Friday, Secretary of Cultural Resources Susan Kluttz, Chief Deputy Secretary Karin Cochran, Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry and Keith Hardison, Director of State Historic Sites and Properties, toured the Department’s sites and offices in western North Carolina. During the course of the trip, they visited Fort Dobbs in Statesville, Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort, Zebulon B. Vance Birthplace in Weaverville and the Thomas Wolfe Memorial in Asheville.

Historic Sites Director Keith Hardison, Sec. Susan Kluttz and Thomas Wolfe Memorial Site Manager Christian Edwards

Historic Sites Director Keith Hardison, Sec. Susan Kluttz and Thomas Wolfe Memorial Site Manager Christian Edwards

In addition, they also visited the Department’s western office, which is located right off the grounds of the Veteran’s Administration Hospital in Asheville. At each, the Department leaders listened to staff and supporters, especially those at the Mountain Gateway Museum and Vance Birthplace. The current proposed state budget calls for the former to close and the latter to go dormant.

Kluttz encouraged these supporters to expand the local ‘friends group’ and build greater local government and private support for the site. She also emphasized that while she and the department support the governor’s budget, she values sites  and museums and recognizes these proposed changes will be difficult for all.

“Our department knows how valuable this is,” Kluttz told the McDowell News. “We came up voluntarily because we are concerned about that and we wanted to hear from you.”

Cultural Resources Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry with X children.

Cultural Resources Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry with Tar Heel Junior Historians.

Secretary Kluttz also took a side trip to Wilkes Art Gallery in North Wilkesboro, a non-profit educational organization dedicated to providing quality experiences in the arts through exhibits, classes, workshops and field trips for all ages where she spoke at a dinner on the importance of art in community and in education. The Secretary emphasized the ability of the creative economy to spark local economic development.

Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry, Secretary Susan Kluttz and Fort Dobbs staff member Scott Douglas.

Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry, Secretary Susan Kluttz and Fort Dobbs staff member Scott Douglas.

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