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A commemoration of the Second Battle of Fort Fisher in Kure Beach, a clam chowder cook-off in Beaufort and a night under the stars in Mount Gilead are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are eight suggestions to help you make the most of your weekend:

1. Join Fort Fisher in Kure Beach as it commemorates the Second Battle of Fort Fisher with a re-enactment, kids’ activities, special tours, lectures and music. See this blog post for tips on getting the most out of the event.

2. See demonstrations of a special form of weaving, called tatting, which is used to make lace, Saturday at the President James K. Polk Historic Site in Pineville.

3. Sample four different clam chowders and vote for your favorite, Friday at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort‘s annual Clam Chowder Cook-Off.
4. Celebrate the arrival of winter at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh Saturday by making paper snowflakes with your kids.

5. Spend your Saturday night under the stars at Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead.

6. Hear about Bath’s key role as a port in early North Carolina and see a new exhibit celebrating Bath as North Carolina’s “First Town, First Port” at Historic Bath Thursday.

7. Listen to the smooth jazz sounds of Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald
as performed by the N.C. Symphony in Raleigh Friday and Saturday.

8. Learn the story of North Carolina’s early civil rights movement at Tryon Palace in New Bern Thursday.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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Sec. Kluttz with N.C. Heritage Award winner Bill Myers and his family at a reception before the awards ceremony at the Executive Mansion

Sec. Kluttz with N.C. Heritage Award winner Bill Myers and his family at a reception before the awards ceremony at the Executive Mansion

From music to pottery and weaving to Native American dance, North Carolina has a rich heritage of traditional arts and crafts. Late last month, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined the N.C. Arts Council in recognizing five artists who have achieved excellence in heritage art forms.

This year’s five awardees were Madison County bluegrass fiddler Bobby Hicks; Wilson County jazz and R&B musician Bill Myers; Halifax County Haliwa-Saponi artist and musician Arnold Richardson; Jackson County weaver Susan Morgan Leveille; and Moore County potter Sid Luck. You can learn more about each recipient on the Arts Council’s website.

N.C. Arts Council Executive Director Wayne Martin narrates as Heritage Award winner and potter Sid Luck demonstrates his craft

N.C. Arts Council Executive Director Wayne Martin narrates as Heritage Award winner and potter Sid Luck demonstrates his craft

After seeing an inspiring video tribute to each winner and hearing an overview of his or her accomplishments from Arts Council Executive Director Wayne Martin, the audience got to see a sampling of the heritage art form that each awardee practices. That meant that the Secretary and the hundreds of others in attendance in the Fletcher Opera Theater saw three concerts, a traditional weaving demonstration and the throwing of pot all in just a few hours. It was truly amazing.

To celebrate the work of these accomplished artists, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Now has been airing a segment on each of them. The pieces on Richardson, Hicks and Luck are available online, and the interviews with each of the other two will air later this month.

The N.C. Arts Council also offers a number of first-class resources to help you to experience North Carolina’s rich cultural scene. Be sure to check out its Arts Trails website and Summer Performing Arts guide to plan your adventure.

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