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Posts Tagged ‘Triad’

Charlotte Hawkins Brown

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina women’s history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit on the women of our state’s past.

Noted African-American educator and founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute, Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown was born in Henderson. She moved to Massachusetts with her family when she was young, but returned to North Carolina in 1901 to help educate southern blacks.

In 1902, Brown established the Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia. She named the school for Alice Freeman Palmer, a former president of Wellesley College, who was a friend and benefactor. It first operated out of an old blacksmith shop, but eventually grew to house hundreds of students in more than a dozen buildings. Palmer grew to become known as an elite black preparatory school, hosting students from all over the country and world.

During her tenure at Palmer, Brown actively toured, speaking on behalf of women’s suffrage and racial equality. She devoted her life to the improvement of the African American community’s social standing and was active in the National Council of Negro Women, an organization founded by celebrated educator Mary McLeod Bethune in 1935. As president of the North Carolina State Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs, Brown also directed African American women’s formal civic experiences for more than 20 years.

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An image of Garber from the  Winston Salem Journal

An image of Garber from the Winston Salem Journal

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina women’s history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit on the women of our state’s past.

A pioneer in the field of sports journalism, Mary Garber worked for the Winston-Salem Journal and its predecessor, the Twin City Sentinel, for more than 60 years. Garber got her break in the business when the sports editor at the Sentinel left to fight in World War II. She had previously written for the society page and as a general assignment reporter.

The only female sports reporter on the job in the area for nearly 30 years, Garber broke down racial barriers, too. In the midst of the segregationist atmosphere of the 1940s and 1950s, Garber was one of the few white reporters to cover black high school and college athletics.

During her more than 40-year career, Garber garnered more than 40 national and state awards for sports writing and was elected to the North Carolina Journalism and Sports Halls of Fame. She also became the first woman to join the U.S. Basketball Writers Hall of Fame in 2000.

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