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Posts Tagged ‘Sec. Susan Kluttz’

Secretary Kluttz and N.C. Museum of History Director Ken Howard inside at the Cedars in the Pines on the Plaza festival

Secretary Kluttz and N.C. Museum of History Director Ken Howard
inside at the Cedars in the Pines on the Plaza festival

When you think of immigrants to North Carolina, you might think of the Scotch-Irish in the Sandhills, the Swiss around New Bern or the Moravians in the Triad. Chances are the Lebanese might not be near the top of your list. But earlier this month, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz got a taste (literally!) of the deep roots of the Lebanese community in North Carolina at the N.C. Museum of History’s Cedars in Pines on the Plaza festival.

The event celebrated the long legacy of the Lebanese in Tar Heel State. The Cedar in the Pines exhibit that the event is tied to explores how the group has changed and been changed by North Carolina since its members began to arrive here around 1880.

While at the festival, the Secretary sampled some the finest local Lebanese food and watched displays of Lebanese-American music and dance. Crafts, henna hand painting, Arabic calligraphy, a scavenger hunt were some of the activities that  rounded out the day.

If you missed the festival, have no fear! The exhibit will  go on view at Tryon Palace in New Bern between September 12 and December 14.

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Sec. Kluttz, Gov. McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler accept the grant check from SECU Foundation Chariman McKinley Wooten and SECU Foundation Executive Director Mark Twisdale

Sec. Kluttz, Gov. McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler accept
the grant check from SECU Foundation Chariman McKinley Wooten and
SECU Foundation Executive Director Mark Twisdale

The N.C. Museum of Art’s (NCMA) education program has long been celebrated as one of the best in the country, but thanks to a new $1.9 million grant from the SECU Foundation, it’s about to get even better.

The grant will be used to extend the Museum’s art education outreach through the establishment of a vibrant, state-of-the-art Education Center that will become the portal for accessing the Museum’s world class collections of art, special exhibitions and educational programs both on-site and virtually throughout North Carolina. Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined Governor Pat McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler in accepting the grant from SECU Foundation Board Chair McKinley Wooten earlier this summer.

Construction is expected to begin in the Spring of 2015 for an inventive auditorium, adjacent studio, classrooms and distance learning center; all equipped with the latest technology, but you can connect with NCMA’s first-class educational resources today. The ArtNC website and kids and families calendar are two great places to start interacting with NCMA’s innovative art offerings.

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Secretary Kluttz and Town Creek Indian Mound Site Manager Rich Thompson climb the mound at the Town Creek Indian Mound

Secretary Kluttz and Town Creek Indian Mound Site Manager Rich Thompson climb the mound at the Town Creek Indian Mound

There aren’t many places in North Carolina—or the country, even—where you can see the power of archaeology more than at Town Creek Indian Mound in Montgomery County.

Archaeologists led by UNC’s Dr. Joffre Coe began working on the site in the late 1930s, and it’s through Coe’s lifelong commitment to the area and to Native American archaeology that Town Creek was able to open as North Carolina’s first state historic site in 1955. It’s also because of Coe’s efforts that the site now has reconstructed buildings that show what the area would have been like for the Pee Dee civilization thousands of years ago.

Secretary Kluttz helps cut the cake for Dr. Coe's birthday birthday party

Secretary Kluttz helps cut the cake for Dr. Coe’s birthday birthday party

Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined site staff and dozens from the community last month to celebrate what would’ve been Coe’s 98th birthday if he was still alive. After cutting a cake and enjoying a piece with local scout and 4-H groups, the Secretary toured this unique site. She especially enjoyed seeing the cutaway walls which many of the buildings have to help visitors see how the Pee Dee Indians would’ve originally built them.

One of the most exciting discoveries that Secretary Kluttz learned of while at Town Creek is that the work isn’t finished yet. Researchers from North Carolina universities are still excavating areas of the site, and they‘ve just recently uncovered some new buildings.

If you haven’t yet been, Town Creek Indian Mound is certainly worth a visit. Located about an hour and half from Raleigh, Fayetteville, the Triad and Charlotte, the site is an easy drive from just about anywhere in Piedmont.

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Secretary Kluttz learns about operating the printing press at Historic Halifax

Secretary Kluttz learns about operating the printing press at Historic Halifax from Assistant Site Manager Carl Burke

Hundreds of well-wishers looked on as 30 immigrants from 23 countries officially became American citizens at the State Capitol this Fourth of July, and Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz was proud to be there to help officiate.

After the Oath of Allegiance was administered and America welcomed its 30 newest citizens, a military-style band played, kicking off a day of revelry that included musical performances, historical and military displays, carriage rides, face painting and hands-on activities for kids.

Secretary Kluttz and Deputy Secretary for Archives and History Kevin Cherry enjoy the Fourth of July festivities at the State Capitol

Soon back on the road, the Secretary had another Independence Day celebration to attend at Historic Halifax. In Halifax, Secretary Kluttz toured the site with Assistant Site Manager Carl Burke before working a hand-operated printing press.

Though the Secretary had been to Halifax before for a session with a number of organizations and state Sen. Angela Bryant on how to leverage the the area’s rich history for economic development, she hadn’t yet seen the impressive Montfort Archaeology Exhibit, which combines panel exhibits with walkways over archaeological excavations around the foundations of a home which demonstrates what life was like for a wealth early resident of Halifax.

The day rounded out with more fun Fourth of July activities, including food and fireworks. In short, the Secretary and Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry were excited to spend Independence Day in the town where independence from Great Britain was first called for by a state assembly.

WRAL did a great story on the ceremony at the Capitol, and photos from the entire event are available on the Capitol’s Flickr site.

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Sec. Kluttz and Department of Commerce Sec. Sharon Decker present Ben Long with an Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award

Sec. Kluttz and Department of Commerce Sec. Sharon Decker present
Ben Long with an Order of the Long Leaf Pine Award

If you know Ashe County, then you know that the area is famous for quite a few things—the Blue Ridge Parkway runs through it, you can find some awesome cheese there, Christmas trees grow on the side of almost every mountain and some talented old-time musicians call the region home.

Perhaps the most famous things you’ll find in the county, though, are frescoes by noted artist Ben Long. Late last month, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz had the privilege of meeting Mr. Long and joining N.C. Department of Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker in presenting him with an Order of the Long Leaf Pine award.

“I am honored to be here tonight to celebrate someone whose art has had a tremendous impact on North Carolina and our cultural resources,” said Secretary Kluttz said after presenting Mr. Long with the award. “By sharing his talent, Ben Long has brought worldwide attention to our state. We are most grateful for his contributions.”

The award, one of the most prestigious in the state, is given by the governor for outstanding service to the state.

Though best known for the frescoes he painted in two Ashe County churches during the 1970s which draw thousands of the visitors to the area every year,Ben Long has also painted frescoes in Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Iredell, Mecklenburg and Wilkes counties. His first frescoes are actually in Italy.

Aside from his fresco work, Long has had a long and successful career as a portrait artist.

The event was sponsored by the Ashe County Frescoes Foundation and held at the Jefferson Landing Clubhouse in Jefferson.

Check out VisitNC’s Project 543 blog and the websites of the Ashe County Frescoes Foundation and the Ben Long Fresco Trail for more on how you can see Ben Long’s world class art in person.

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The week after Memorial Day, thousands of folks from 41 states and five foreign countries crowded around the Bob Julian Roundhouse at the N.C. Transportation Museum to celebrate the arrival of 26 classic streamlined, diesel locomotives dating from the 1930s through the 1950s.

The event, called Streamliners at Spencer, was so popular that all the hotel rooms in surrounding Rowan County were sold out during its four-day run.

As part of the festivities, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined Norfolk Southern CEO Charles Moorman and officials from the N.C. Transportation Museum Foundation and Virginia Museum of Transportation in welcoming everyone to Spencer. The pair also thanked the staff and sponsors for their hard work and generosity that made the event possible and turned the ceremonial screw that kicked off the restoration of Norfolk and Western Class J 611.

That particular locomotive will be restored at the museum during the coming months.

Photos from Streamliners are available on the N.C. Transportation Museum’s website.

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Sec. Kluttz speaks at the Battleship’s Memorial Day celebration

This Memorial Day, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz, Governor Pat McCrory and several other members of his Cabinet joined Battleship North Carolina Executive Director Captain Terry Bragg and a crowd of hundreds to pay their respects to those who have served our country throughout the years.

Secretary Kluttz introduced Governor Pat McCrory, who spoke to the importance of military members and their contribution to North Carolina’s security and economy.

After an emotional commemorative ceremony complete with musical arrangements from a military band and a keynote address by Brig. Gen. Robert F. Castellvi, the top commander at Camp Lejeune, the Secretary, Gov. McCrory, Capt. Bragg and members of the Battleship North Carolina Commission received a check from the State Employees Credit Union Foundation, which pledged $3 million to build a memorial walkway around the ship.

See photos of the day’s activities in the Wilmington Star-News and on the Governor’s Flickr site.

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