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The temperatures and dropping outside and before you know it cabin fever will begin to set in. Fight off the boredom of being stuck inside with these five great digital resources we have to offer:
 
1. The Our State Magazine Digital Collection, where you can explore issues of one of North Carolina’s premiere publications dating back to 1933 any time for free.
 
Our State Digital Collection
 
2. Our This Day in North Carolina History Project, which tells some of most interesting (and bizarre) tales from our state’s past, including the story of North Carolina’s “Year Without a Summer” in 1816.
 
This Day in N.C. History
 
3. The State Archives Flickr site, where you can find nearly 7,000 images of everything from Civil War battles to snake handlers in Durham and beyond, including some great historical shots of snow.
 
State Archives Flickr
 
4. NCpedia, an online encyclopedia about all things North Carolina.
 
NCpedia
 
5. The State Library’s ExploreNC topic guides, which provide a centralized list of resources on a number of different topics including weather.
 
ExploreNC
 
Enjoy the weather, and stay warm!

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The State Seal in the governor's office

The State Seal in the governor’s office

Minutes before Pat McCrory is publicly sworn in as governor in the Old Senate Chamber on Saturday, a lesser-known transfer-of-power ceremony will take place. The ceremony centers around the Great Seal of the State, which symbolizes the change in authority from one governor to the next. The seal is kept by State Archives but generally remains in the governor’s office at the State Capitol.

The ceremony is actually quite simple. Outgoing Governor Beverly Perdue will read an oath to Governor-Elect McCrory, which he will then repeat. McCrory will then make an impression of the seal on a piece of paper and deposit it into his official papers, which are also maintained by the State Archives. Secretary of State Elaine Marshall and Chief Justice Sarah Parker will stand by as witnesses as will any others McCrory chooses to invite.

The Great Seal of the State of North Carolina has its origins in the colonial era and officially became the responsibility of the governor under the state constitution of 1776. Since that time, its design underwent major changes in 1974, 1835, 1893 and 1971. A minor change—commemorating the date of the Halifax Resolves—was also made in 1983. You can check out the evolution of the seal’s design from 1665 to present in the diagram above from the N.C. Museum of History.

Changes to the State Seal. Click for the full size.

Changes to the State Seal. Click on the image to see it in its the full size.

Cultural Resources has some other great resources related to the seal and gubernatorial inaugurations, including:

For more on this year’s inauguration, check out the official 2013 Inauguration website.

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