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Posts Tagged ‘jazz’

The chance to “meet” African American legislators from 1868 in Raleigh, a celebration of the life of Maya Angelou in Winston-Salem and a survey of jazz greats in New Bern are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are 10 suggestions to make the most of your time:

1. “Meet” a few members of North Carolina’s 1868 black caucus during a living history program at the State Capitol in Raleigh Saturday.
2. Spend Saturday night under the stars at Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead, one of the state’s best stargazing spots.
3. Honor the life of the legendary Maya Angelou with an evening of poetry and music Thursday at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem.
4. See a new exhibit of photographs that spotlight historic preservation efforts across the state, opening Friday at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.
5. Get a glimpse into the lives and artistic creations of some of North Carolina’s jazz greats and hear some of genre’s most popular tunes Thursday at Tryon Palace in New Bern.
6. Enjoy some of the best classical music by Russian composers at concerts by the N.C. Symphony in Chapel Hill and Raleigh throughout the weekend.
7. Take your kids to see interactive productions of West African fables at Historic Stagville in Durham Saturday and Sunday.
8. Discover tools for learning about your family’s early African American ancestors at a genealogy workshop offered by the State Library Saturday in Raleigh.

 

9. Create a mixed-media canvas at the Museum of Albemarle Friday in Elizabeth City.
10. Join the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh Friday for a screening Now, Voyager, sometimes called the Greatest Generation’s version of Eat Pray Love.

11. Celebrate the 87th annual Academy Awards with a visit to the Starring North Carolina! exhibition at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.

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12. Learn about the often-overlooked history of early Spanish explorers in Appalachia during a lecture Saturday at the Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort.

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Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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A commemoration of the Second Battle of Fort Fisher in Kure Beach, a clam chowder cook-off in Beaufort and a night under the stars in Mount Gilead are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are eight suggestions to help you make the most of your weekend:

1. Join Fort Fisher in Kure Beach as it commemorates the Second Battle of Fort Fisher with a re-enactment, kids’ activities, special tours, lectures and music. See this blog post for tips on getting the most out of the event.

2. See demonstrations of a special form of weaving, called tatting, which is used to make lace, Saturday at the President James K. Polk Historic Site in Pineville.

3. Sample four different clam chowders and vote for your favorite, Friday at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort‘s annual Clam Chowder Cook-Off.
4. Celebrate the arrival of winter at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh Saturday by making paper snowflakes with your kids.

5. Spend your Saturday night under the stars at Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead.

6. Hear about Bath’s key role as a port in early North Carolina and see a new exhibit celebrating Bath as North Carolina’s “First Town, First Port” at Historic Bath Thursday.

7. Listen to the smooth jazz sounds of Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald
as performed by the N.C. Symphony in Raleigh Friday and Saturday.

8. Learn the story of North Carolina’s early civil rights movement at Tryon Palace in New Bern Thursday.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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Bentonville Battlefield will transform into a Civil War campground Saturday, complete with artillery and musket firing demonstrations

Bentonville Battlefield will transform into a Civil War campground Saturday,
complete with artillery and musket firing demonstrations

The weekend kicks off Thursday evening when the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City will screen the 1960 family favorite Swiss Family Robinson.

Friday, the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will invite visitors to wander through its galleries after dark with the down-home bluegrass sounds of The Hey Brothers as a backdrop before showing the popular comedy Nebraska under the stars.

Saturday, Tryon Palace New Bern will host Grammy Award winner Gregory Porter and other top artists for the inaugural Where Rivers Meet Summer Jazz Festival on its picturesque South Lawn, and Bentonville Battlefield in Four Oaks will transform into a Civil War era camp complete with musket and artillery firing demonstrations. In Raleigh, the State Library will put a on a workshop where participants can discover how to find their female ancestors before the N.C. Museum of Art shows The LEGO Movie in its Museum Park.

The weekend wraps up Sunday when the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem will team up with the local nonprofit Bookmarks to show Under the Tuscan Sun.

Throughout the weekend, the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer will host model train layouts, kids’ activities and celebrities of the rail fan world for the Historic Spencer Shops Train Show.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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Sec. Kluttz with N.C. Heritage Award winner Bill Myers and his family at a reception before the awards ceremony at the Executive Mansion

Sec. Kluttz with N.C. Heritage Award winner Bill Myers and his family at a reception before the awards ceremony at the Executive Mansion

From music to pottery and weaving to Native American dance, North Carolina has a rich heritage of traditional arts and crafts. Late last month, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined the N.C. Arts Council in recognizing five artists who have achieved excellence in heritage art forms.

This year’s five awardees were Madison County bluegrass fiddler Bobby Hicks; Wilson County jazz and R&B musician Bill Myers; Halifax County Haliwa-Saponi artist and musician Arnold Richardson; Jackson County weaver Susan Morgan Leveille; and Moore County potter Sid Luck. You can learn more about each recipient on the Arts Council’s website.

N.C. Arts Council Executive Director Wayne Martin narrates as Heritage Award winner and potter Sid Luck demonstrates his craft

N.C. Arts Council Executive Director Wayne Martin narrates as Heritage Award winner and potter Sid Luck demonstrates his craft

After seeing an inspiring video tribute to each winner and hearing an overview of his or her accomplishments from Arts Council Executive Director Wayne Martin, the audience got to see a sampling of the heritage art form that each awardee practices. That meant that the Secretary and the hundreds of others in attendance in the Fletcher Opera Theater saw three concerts, a traditional weaving demonstration and the throwing of pot all in just a few hours. It was truly amazing.

To celebrate the work of these accomplished artists, UNC-TV’s North Carolina Now has been airing a segment on each of them. The pieces on Richardson, Hicks and Luck are available online, and the interviews with each of the other two will air later this month.

The N.C. Arts Council also offers a number of first-class resources to help you to experience North Carolina’s rich cultural scene. Be sure to check out its Arts Trails website and Summer Performing Arts guide to plan your adventure.

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Tryon Palace will host the N.C. Symphony for a free concert
on its South Lawn Sunday. Don’t miss it!

Civil War cannon demonstrations in Fayetteville, a free symphony performance in New Bern and a Renaissance Fair in Raleigh are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The weekend kicks off Thursday morning when staff from the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh will read kids a tall tale after taking a short tour of one of the museum’s wonderful galleries.

Friday, the fun for families continues at the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City, where kids can create a collage inspired by the beach. In the evening, the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will offer visitors the chance to explore its galleries at night against the backdrop of the smooth jazz sounds of Peter Lamb and the Wolves and host a lecture on printmaking and art of Mexican American and Latino artists that complements their dynamic exhibit.

Cannon firing demonstrations will blast off from Fayetteville‘s Arsenal Park Saturday as the Museum of the Cape Fear explores the lesser-known aspects of the Civil War during a living history program, while the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington will come alive with living historians demonstrating what life was like aboard the vessel during World War II.

Sunday, the N.C. Museum of Art will offer merriment, music, games, traditional craft demonstrations and art-making activities for all ages as part of its fanciful Renaissance Fair, while Tryon Palace in New Bern will host its annual free N.C. Symphony concert on the picturesque South Lawn.

Throughout the weekend, the spectacular N.C. Symphony will present concerts of the powerful piece Carmina Burana in Chapel Hill and Raleigh, while the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer will host unique steam locomotives from the 1930s, 40s and 50s for a special four-day festival complete with daytime portraits, special operations, nighttime photos and more.

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John Coltrane

John Coltrane

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit from our state’s African American’s past.

Though they both became New Yorkers during the course of their lives, jazz masters Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane had North Carolina roots that ran deep. Monk was a native of Rocky Mount and Coltrane of Hamlet in Richmond County. Though they followed separate paths to New York, the two artists collaborated there later in their careers.

Thelonious Monk

Thelonious Monk

Perhaps best-known for “’Round Midnight,” Theolonius Monk played music in a style that was original and unorthodox, incorporating elements of stride piano and gospel to create a “rhythmic virtuosity,” striking dissonant notes and playing skewed melodies. Personally, Monk had a reputation as the ultimate hipster.

Though born in Richmond County, John Coltrane was raised in High Point. He made his professional debut in 1945 and collaborated with Monk, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis in several milestone recordings before forming his own group in 1960. In the years before his death at age 40, Coltrane established avant-garde jazz as mainstream, popular music. One measure of Coltrane’s significance is the fact that he has been the subject of at least four biographies.

To discover more about North Carolina’s rich tradition of African-American music, check out the African-American Music Trail, organized by the N.C. Arts Council.

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