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Posts Tagged ‘Institute of Museum and Library Services’

Experience the traditions of holidays past with us Nov. 19 during a live webcast from Tryon Palace in New Bern.

The webcast, streamed live from His Royal Governor’s Cooking Office, will explore the history of the holidays with an 18th-century cooking demonstration, a hands-on historic craft you can make at your location and an interactive discussion exploring colonial holiday traditions.

After Tryon Palace education staff explain how cooks used the kitchen’s massive fireplace to prepare for the season and guide participants through a traditional holiday craft, teachers and students can send questions that will be answered in real time. Though this program is geared toward school children, DCR employees are encouraged to participate.

The webcast will be held Wednesday, November 19, from 10-10:45 a.m. Register online at http://www.ncdcr.gov/DCRTV.

A federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for the Connecting to Collections Initiative makes this entire series possible.

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State Librarian Cal Shepard, Deputy Sec. Kevin Cherry, Greensboro Historical Museum Director Carol Hart, Sec. Susan Kluttz and UNCG Dean of University Libraries Rosann Bazirjian

State Librarian Cal Shepard, Deputy Sec. Kevin Cherry, Greensboro Historical Museum Director Carol Hart, Sec. Susan Kluttz and UNCG Dean of University Libraries Rosann Bazirjian

Thanks in part to five grants from the State Library more than 175,000 images from Greensboro history are now available online through an innovative project called Textiles, Teachers and Troops.

Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz, Deputy Secretary Kevin Cherry and State Librarian Cal Shepard were on hand for the unveiling of the project earlier this month, and both the Secretary and Dr. Cherry spoke about the importance of making materials from libraries and archives available online for the public to explore.

This circa 1890-1910 photo of members of the Proximity Mill baseball team is just one of thousands of items now available online through the Textiles, Teachers and Troops.

This circa 1890-1910 photo of members
of the Proximity Mill baseball team is just one of thousands of items now available online through the Textiles, Teachers and Troops.

A collaboration between seven institutions—Bennett College, Greensboro College, the Greensboro Historical Museum, the Greensboro Public Library, Guilford College, N.C. A&T University and UNC Greensboro—the project is aimed at making local history accessible to researchers, genealogists, students and others.

All seven institutions contributed photos, books, personal papers, scrapbooks and oral histories to the online repository, which tells the story of Greensboro’s growth from Reconstruction to World War II. Though the materials span a wide range of subjects, the collection has a special emphasis on the textile industry, education and military life and shows how these three areas helped the city develop into a regional powerhouse during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The grants that made the project possible were from federal Library Services and Technology Act funds that are administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and awarded by the State Library to eligible North Carolina libraries.

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The frock coat of Lt. Col. Thomas Ruffin will be one of the items shown in the webcast

The frock coat of Lt. Col. Thomas Ruffin will be one of the items shown in the webcast

The bloodied coat of Lt. Col. Thomas Ruffin of Johnston County, worn when he was mortally wounded in battle in Virginia Oct. 15, 1863, is a challenge for N.C. Museum of History Conservator Paige Myers. As a conservator she seeks to prevent further damage to textiles in her care even as the ravages of war are still evident.

During a live webcast September 10 from the N.C. Museum of History, you can get a behind-the-scenes look at a working textile conservation lab and see some of techniques Myers uses to conserve Civil War uniforms.

Some of the highlights of the program will include:

  • A demonstration of treatment for the blood-stained frock coat worn by Lt. Col. Thomas H. Ruffin, of Franklin County
  • A look at the moth eaten frock coat of Col. Dennis D. Ferebee of Camden County
  • Discussion on the various treatments that conservators use to preserve Civil War-era fabrics and uniforms
  • The chance to ask Myers questions about her work and textiles in the museum’s collection via email and live chat

The webcast will be held on Tuesday, September 10 from 6 to 7 p.m., and an Internet connection is all that is required to participate. To register, simply fill out the form at http://www.ncdcr.gov/CivilWarTextiles.

This program is the first in a series organized by the Connecting to Collections Project (C2C) of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, in cooperation with the N.C. Museum of History. Future programs will examine the conservation of flags and garments from civilian life during the Civil War. The entire series is made possible thanks to a federal grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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A page from the digitized version  of a 1925 issue of the North Carolina  Historical Review

A page from the digitized version of a 1925 issue of the North Carolina Historical Review

If you’ve visited the Digital Collections of the State Archives and State Library lately, you may have a noticed a significant new addition. The first forty-four volumes (1924-1967) of the North Carolina Historical Review are now available online there. First published by North Carolina Historical Publications in the spring of 1924, the quarterly Review quickly became known for scholarly excellence. It continues that legacy today.

Now in its ninetieth year of publication, the North Carolina Historical Review has provided a forum for students, historians and the general public to explore North Carolina’s rich history. Each issue of the Review contains several articles and essays, a selection of book reviews and notes of historical interest. Access to these new digital volumes is free, and the full text of each of the 176 issues digitized by the State Library is searchable.

Digitization of the North Carolina Historical Review was made possible through a Library Services and Technology Act grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). LTSA funds have also supported many other projects housed, in the North Carolina Digital Collections, a joint project of the State Archives and the State Library of North Carolina.

Print copies and subscriptions can be purchased online through the North Carolina Historical Publications store.

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