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Posts Tagged ‘Historic Stagville’

The chance to “meet” African American legislators from 1868 in Raleigh, a celebration of the life of Maya Angelou in Winston-Salem and a survey of jazz greats in New Bern are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are 10 suggestions to make the most of your time:

1. “Meet” a few members of North Carolina’s 1868 black caucus during a living history program at the State Capitol in Raleigh Saturday.
2. Spend Saturday night under the stars at Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead, one of the state’s best stargazing spots.
3. Honor the life of the legendary Maya Angelou with an evening of poetry and music Thursday at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem.
4. See a new exhibit of photographs that spotlight historic preservation efforts across the state, opening Friday at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.
5. Get a glimpse into the lives and artistic creations of some of North Carolina’s jazz greats and hear some of genre’s most popular tunes Thursday at Tryon Palace in New Bern.
6. Enjoy some of the best classical music by Russian composers at concerts by the N.C. Symphony in Chapel Hill and Raleigh throughout the weekend.
7. Take your kids to see interactive productions of West African fables at Historic Stagville in Durham Saturday and Sunday.
8. Discover tools for learning about your family’s early African American ancestors at a genealogy workshop offered by the State Library Saturday in Raleigh.

 

9. Create a mixed-media canvas at the Museum of Albemarle Friday in Elizabeth City.
10. Join the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh Friday for a screening Now, Voyager, sometimes called the Greatest Generation’s version of Eat Pray Love.

11. Celebrate the 87th annual Academy Awards with a visit to the Starring North Carolina! exhibition at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.

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12. Learn about the often-overlooked history of early Spanish explorers in Appalachia during a lecture Saturday at the Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort.

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Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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Stargazing with an African twist in Durham, an exploration of African American sailors during the Civil War in Southport and a day of free admission to Tryon Palace in New Bern are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are eight suggestions to help you make the most of your time:

1. Hear African folklore about the night sky and peer through telescopes to take a tour of the stars Friday at Historic Stagville in Durham.

 

 

2. In New Bern, explore Tryon Palace’s historic buildings and gardens for free Saturday.

 

 

3. Relax and enjoy a concert of some of the best of bluegrass Saturday at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem.

 

 

4. Join the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh for a screening of the 1947 film Pitch a Boogie Woogie Saturday. The movies was the first made by a production company based in North Carolina and stars an all-black cast.

 

 

5. Discover the similarities between the visual arts and jazz of the 20th century with a gallery tour and chamber music concert, Sunday at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

 

 

6. See North Carolina history through photographer Hugh Morton’s eyes and learn about his life during a free lecture at Tryon Palace in New Bern Saturday.

 

 

7. Hear the stories of men who escaped enslavement and enlisted in the Union Navy Saturday at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport.

 

 

8. Enjoy concerts of masterpieces by Mozart and Beethoven as performed by the N.C. Symphony throughout the weekend in Raleigh and New Bern.

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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North Carolina’s historic sites, museums and other cultural institutions will be spreading good cheer across the state this weekend.

Civil War-style celebrations of Christmas in Durham and Four Oaks, a Polar Express adventure in Elizabeth City and a 1940s holiday bash in Sedalia are just a sampling of fun programs you’ll find throughout Tar Heel State.

Here are 17 events not to miss:

1. Cookies and cocoa at Dr. Brown’s home in Sedalia Saturday. The snacks are part of a larger program at the Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum that looks at Christmas during the 1940s.

2. Music, crafts, food and fun as part of Christmas at the Big House, Christmas at the Quarters at Historic Stagville in Durham Saturday.

3. 1830s Christmas Candlelight tours of Vance Birthplace in Weaverville Saturday, where visitors will play the part of travelers seeking lodging for the night at the Vance home.

4. A Civil War Christmas at Bennett Place in Durham Saturday and Sunday, complete with traditional cooking demonstrations, caroling and decorations from the period.

5. Ornament-making at Mount Gilead‘s Town Creek Indian Mound Saturday. Visitors can choose to make edible “orniments” for birds or a clay decoration for their tree.

6. A German-style “Golden Christmas” at Reed Gold Mine in Midland Saturday. Craft demonstrations, candlelight tours of the mine and activities for the kids will all be part of the fun.

7. Refreshments and the chance to see what life was like for common Civil War soldiers on furlough during the holidays during Bentonville Battlefield’s Christmas program in Four OaksSaturday.

  

8. A fun-filled Christmas extravaganza featuring classic seasonal songs throughout the weekend at Roanoke Island Festival Park in Manteo.

9. Pinecone decorating and stories surrounding the origins of the Christmas tree as part of aVictorian Christmas at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport Saturday. 

10. A Crystal Coast Christmas Flotilla along the Beaufort waterfront Saturday night, right near the N.C. Maritime Museum.

11. A glimpse into the splendor of the season on an antebellum plantation, complete with traditional decorations and a good ole’ fashion Southern meal, Sunday at Somerset Place inCreswell.  

12. Nighttime tours of Durham‘s Duke Homestead decorated for an 1870s Christmas Friday.

13. Arms drills, cannon firing and displays of Civil War camp life at Fort Fisher in Kure Beach Saturday to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first Federal attack there .

14. A Polar Express-themed holiday celebration at the Museum of Albemarle in Elizabeth City Saturday, featuring carriage rides and a model train village based on the family film favorite.

15. Performances of Handel’s Messiah by the N.C. Symphony and N.C. Master Chorale throughout the weekend in Raleigh and Southern Pines.

16. A lecture and book signing on growing up in Raleigh during the 1940s and 50s Sunday at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.

17. Stories of Christmas past and special treats at the Mountain Gateway Museum Saturday, in conjunction with the Old Fort Christmas parade.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend! If you know someone who’d like to receive these emails, they can sign up on the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources website.

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Durham’s Duke Homestead will be transformed into a Victorian house
in mourning Saturday. Stop by for a candlelight tour!

Spooktacular crafts and games for the whole family in New Bern, tours of a Victorian house in mourning in Durham and a Civil War field hospital brought to life in Four Oaks are just of the few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The fun starts Friday when the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wind Band performs a concert on Tryon Palace’s picturesque South Lawn in New Bern, and the Museum of the Albemarle helps kids create a colorful piece of fall-themed art in Elizabeth City. In Raleigh, staff from the N.C. Museum of History will give advice to visitors on how to best preserve their family treasures, and the N.C. Museum of Art will host a lunch and lecture highlighting the history of female artists in its collection.

Saturday, Historic Stagville in Durham will highlight the “secret” history of pumpkins, serve up some pumpkin-themed desserts and help kids carve a pumpkin of their own, while the State Library and State Archives will host speakers and a variety of exhibitors during their annual Family History Fair in Raleigh. Just outside the Triangle in Four Oaks, Bentonville Battlefield will have wagon rides, corn shucking and carnival games as part of its fall festival, before coming alive as a Civil War field hospital in the evening, with interpreters portraying surgeons performing operations and amputations. Also in the evening, Durham‘s Duke Homestead will be transformed into a house in mourning for special candlelight tours.

Elsewhere in the Piedmont,  the Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville will offer ghost stories, traditional Halloween carnival games and a trick or treat at its 1897 Poe House, while Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead will invite visitors to enjoy an evening of stargazing on its grounds. The N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer will have hay rides, old-time games and crafts and a pumpkin patch for kids as part of its inaugural harvest festival.

At the coast Saturday,Tryon Palace will explore the history of Halloweens past and offer spooktacular crafts and games for the whole family as the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport tells tales of lost souls, pirates and other mysteries from the Lower Cape Fear region in celebration of Halloween. Historic Edenton will celebrate the 240th anniversary of the Edenton Tea Party with colonial games and activities for families, while the Museum of the Albemarle hosts a murder mystery tea party.

In Asheville, Lenoir-Rhyne writing professor Laura Hope-Gill will offer a “Write with the Wolfe” workshop for new writers and lead an architecture tour of Asheville focusing on the buildings of Thomas Wolfe’s era in conjunction with the Thomas Wolfe Memorial.

Throughout the weekend, the N.C. Symphony will perform Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto in Raleigh and Chapel Hill, and the Museum of the Cape Fear will host its annual Halloween tours of the Poe House.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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Halloween is just around the corner, and North Carolina’s state historic sites and museums are celebrating in a whole bunch of neat ways. To help you get the most of your limited time, we’ve collected the ten of the best ways you can get culture on this Halloween:

1. Take your kids trick or treating aboard the Battleship North Carolina in Wilmington.

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2. See how the Victorians mourned their dead on one of Duke Homestead’s Widows and Wakes tours in Durham.

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3. Hear about one of the spookier items in the N.C. Museum of Art’s permanent collection before watching a local magician and sipping on a beer in Raleigh.

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4. Learn about the “secret” history of pumpkins, sample pumpkin-based foods and paint a pumpkin of your own at Historic Stagville in Durham.

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5. Enjoy tales of lost souls, pirates and other mysteries of the Lower Cape Fear region at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport.

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6. Take your kids to hear the ghoulish sounds of The Sorcerer’s Apprentice performed by the N.C. Symphony in Raleigh.

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7. See how Halloween was celebrated around the turn of the 19th century on a night tour of the Poe House in Fayetteville.

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8. Meet friendly ghosts on the grounds of Tryon Palace in New Bern after celebrating “All Hallow’s Eve” with crafts, games, spooky stories and a 1940s-inspired radio show.

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9. Trick or treat through the Tar Heel State’s history at the N.C. Museum of History’s “The Story of North Carolina” exhibit in Raleigh.

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10. Meet a pirate at Halloween in Halifax after seeing Blackbeard’s booty in the Queen Anne’s Revenge traveling exhibit.

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Our event offerings don’t stop after Halloween, so be sure to stay tuned to our events calendar and sign up for our weekly event emails to stay in the loop.

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Sec. Kluttz with Michael Twitty at Historic Stagvvile

Sec. Kluttz with Michael Twitty at Historic Stagvvile

It has only been about a month since Sec. Susan Kluttz last visited Historic Stagville in Durham, but upon hearing of the their Harvest Festival last weekend, she knew that she didn’t want to miss a moment of the excitement.

The focus of the day’s event at Stagville was food. Upon entering Horton Grove, the Secretary was greeted by the smell of smoke and pork cooking over an open fire. What made the scene truly remarkable was that historic interpreters were cooking in the same spots that members of one of the largest communities of enslaved people in the South had cooked in before the Civil War.

As the morning went on, Sec. Kluttz met several influential historians that focus on foodways, including Michael Twitty, who is especially known for his study of the food of enslaved people; Jerome Bias, a Stagville board member and historic interpreter at Old Salem; Debbi Moose, a noted cookbook author and former food editor of the News & Observer; and Dr. Valerie Johnson, a member of the N.C. Historical Commission.

The event was nothing if not authentic in its interpretation. The meat was cooked on green saplings over an open fire as children rode by on wagons pulled by mules. City of Raleigh Museum director Ernest Dollar even spent Friday night at the site to ensure the meat was perfectly prepared for Saturday’s festivities!

The program at Stagville is just the first in a series of events presented by the historic sites and museums of N.C. Department of Cultural Resources this fall celebrating the history of food and the harvest.

Duke Homestead, also in Durham has its Harvest and Hornworm Festival coming up this weekend. Check back here for more event news as fall blossoms into full swing.

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Join the Museum of the Cape Fear for the Festival of Yesteryear Saturday

Join the Museum of the Cape Fear for the Festival of Yesteryear Saturday

A pirate r-enactment in Winnabow, food trucks and a film in Raleigh and classic car show in Spencer are just a few of the opportunities for family fun you’ll find at our sites and museums this weekend.

The fun starts Friday with the opening of the Queen Anne’s Revenge traveling exhibit at the Chowan County Courthouse in Historic Edenton. The exhibit will end its run in Edenton on October 19. Farther inland, the cross-genre group Pink Martini will play a concert at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

The Triangle will come alive with more fun Saturday. The N.C. Museum of Art will host four different events:

In Durham, Historic Stagville will offer tours, costumed interpreters, cooking demonstrations, mule and wagon rides and a lecture on the lives of the enslaved population as part of its Harvest Festival.

Toward the coast, Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson in Winnabow will stage a re-enactment of the 1748 Spanish attack on Brunswick, while the Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville will host its annual Festival of Yesteryear, complete with re-enactors representing the Colonial era and War of 1812 performing a variety of activities, period music and games and a period dance workshop.  In the evening, the museum will host a Regency Ball in the traditional Jane Austen style.

In the west, the Southeatern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) invites you stop by their booth at the Bookmarks Festival in downtown Winston-Salem, while the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer hosts a MOPAR-focused car show and the James K. Polk Historic Site in Pineville celebrates Sarah Polk’s birthday with a lecture on her life.

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