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Posts Tagged ‘education’

Van-Orley-Penetecost

Conservation treatment of The Pentecost, circa 1530 (by a follower of Bernard van Orley, oil on panel, 37 1/2 x 43 1/2 in, Purchased with funds from the State of North Carolina).

In the past few years, the N.C. Museum of Art has been making headlines for using cutting-edge technology to conserve art that is often centuries old.

During a webcast next week, we’ll go behind-the-scenes to the museum’s conservation lab and talk with conservators about how they do their work and why it’s important.

Associate Conservator Perry Hurt will review the 21st century process of laser cleaning 16th century artworks (demonstrated in this video), while Chief Conservator Bill Brown and other members of the museum’s conservation team will explain the process of cleaning, varnishing and retouching some of the museum’s oldest paintings.

As part of the program, viewers will have the opportunity to ask questions of NCMA’s conservation staff live.

The webcast will be held Thursday, February 4, at 11 a.m. and registration for school groups and individuals is now open online.

 

Register Now for the Webcast →

 

This program is part of the ongoing DNCRTV series, produced by the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources, which brings the state’s cultural institutions and natural treasures to viewers wherever they are across the state, nation and world.

It is organized in tandem with NCMA’s Actual State exhibition, opening February 20, in which conservator Noelle Ocon will work through the conservation process before the public in the museum gallery.

somer_58_3_1_2015_perry_using_laser_to_remove_overpaint__3_smaller_2

NCMA Associate Conservator Perry Hurt works on a painting in the museum’s lab.

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Sec. Kluttz, Gov. McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler accept the grant check from SECU Foundation Chariman McKinley Wooten and SECU Foundation Executive Director Mark Twisdale

Sec. Kluttz, Gov. McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler accept
the grant check from SECU Foundation Chariman McKinley Wooten and
SECU Foundation Executive Director Mark Twisdale

The N.C. Museum of Art’s (NCMA) education program has long been celebrated as one of the best in the country, but thanks to a new $1.9 million grant from the SECU Foundation, it’s about to get even better.

The grant will be used to extend the Museum’s art education outreach through the establishment of a vibrant, state-of-the-art Education Center that will become the portal for accessing the Museum’s world class collections of art, special exhibitions and educational programs both on-site and virtually throughout North Carolina. Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined Governor Pat McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler in accepting the grant from SECU Foundation Board Chair McKinley Wooten earlier this summer.

Construction is expected to begin in the Spring of 2015 for an inventive auditorium, adjacent studio, classrooms and distance learning center; all equipped with the latest technology, but you can connect with NCMA’s first-class educational resources today. The ArtNC website and kids and families calendar are two great places to start interacting with NCMA’s innovative art offerings.

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The back-to-school season is now officially upon us, which means before too long it’ll be time for that time-honored tradition of helping your kids with homework that might be just as much of a challenge for you as it is for them.

Have no fear! Our fantastic educational resources cover just about every topic related to the history, art and culture of the Old North State, and most of them are available online and for free to help you avoid headaches when helping your kids with their history or art homework this school year.

Here are few places to start:

  1. Our Cultural Resources Educational Tool has put all of the educational materials produced by our 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, historic preservation office, archaeology office, highway markers program, State Library, State Archives, N.C. Symphony and N.C. Arts Council in one place. Check out this tool to search thousands of articles, research guides, multimedia pieces and more by topic, historical era, grade level and keyword.
  2. NCpedia.org is a free, online encyclopedia about North Carolina. Produced by the State Library, NCpedia includes entries from the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography and the Encyclopedia of North Carolina, among other popular reference materials to cover just about any topic you can think of related to the Tar Heel State.
  3. From the origins of the Lost Colony myth to Blackbeard’s demise off the coast of Beaufort, the This Day in North Carolina History Project tells the weird, wacky and wonderful stories of the people and places of the Tar Heel State’s history day-by-day in easy to digest, 200-word blurbs. Each post links to related educational resources from across our department to help you teach your kids about our state’s past.
  4. Produced by the N.C. Museum of Art, ArtNC helps students and teachers connect art to what they’re learning and teaching by using abstract ideas spanning grade level, subject area, content and skill and relating them to NCMA works of art and their historical contexts.

Still have questions? NCKnows can help! A project of the State Library and NC LIVE, NCKnows allows you to connect with a public or academic librarian online nearly 24/7 to get help and find library resources.

Good luck! And if we can do anything to help you slog through your kids homework this school year, don’t hesitate to drop us a line, post on our Facebook page, tweet at us or leave a comment below. We’re happy to help!

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Art is important to enriching lives, but it’s so much more than that.  In fact, art is just as much about sparking economic development as it is anything else. Over the past week and half, Cultural Resources Sec. Susan Kluttz took several trips to explore some of North Carolina’s diverse arts offerings, see first-hand how art is growing local economies and make an important economic development announcement.

Sec. Kluttz with Pamela Myers, the Asheville Art Museum’s executive director; Carolyn Coward, a member the museum’s campaign committee; and Rob Pulleyn, the immediate past chairman of the museum’s board of trustees.

Sec. Kluttz with Pamela Myers, the Asheville Art Museum’s executive director; Carolyn Coward, a member the museum’s campaign committee; and Rob Pulleyn, the immediate past chairman of the museum’s board of trustees.

Sec. Kluttz started her exploration of the arts with a visit to the Asheville Art Museum. The museum focuses on American art of the 20th and 21st centuries, and is known as a leader both in the state and the region. While at the museum, Sec. Kluttz was wowed by their collections, learned about the art scene in the region and was thrilled to meet several of the museum’s key supporters and staff members.

Sec. Kluttz speaks at Women of Note event

Sec. Kluttz speaks at the Women of Note event

Last Monday, Sec. Kluttz was honored to speak at the N.C. Symphony for its Women of Note luncheon, celebrating the symphony’s extensive music education program. In her remarks, Sec. Kluttz emphasized the importance of art and music in education and economic development, how it’s each person’s responsibility to spread the power of arts involvement to others and praised the symphony for having the largest education program of any symphony orchestra in the country.

On Thursday, Sec. Kluttz made an important announcement on the role of the arts in North Carolina’s economic development. The N.C. Arts Council (NCAC) has been working hard to quantify the impact the arts have on jobs and other aspects of economic growth, and she shared the good news they found.

Sec. Kluttz with Sherry DeVries, executive director of the Durham Arts Council, and Chris and Carl Gergen, key note speakers at

Sec. Kluttz with Sherry DeVries, executive director of the Durham Arts Council, and Chris and Carl Gergen, key note speakers at the Creative Entrepreneur Expo

Specifically, the Arts Council’s research team found an 8-percent growth in creative occupations in the state. Creative industries are now responsible for nearly 320,000 jobs. That’s 6-percent of North Carolina’s overall workforce and translates into more than $12 billion in annual wages. Wow! Sec. Kluttz made the announcement at the Durham Arts Council’s Creative Entrepreneur Expo in Durham.

While at the expo, the Secretary also met some of the innovative business people who are using the arts to help our state grow, and some of the scholars and government leaders who are helping document and support their work.

The Secretary wrapped up her arts tour (for now at least!) Friday morning in Concord when she joined local officials at the Cabarrus Arts Council for the council’s Breakfast for the Arts fundraiser.  Before coming to Cultural Resources, Sec. Kluttz served as the president of the Rowan Arts Council, so she was happy to help support the work of a neighbor!

Sec. Kluttz with Concord Mayor Scott Padgett and Noelle Rhodes Scott, President & CEO of Cabarrus Arts Council.

Sec. Kluttz with Concord Mayor Scott Padgett and Noelle Rhodes Scott, President & CEO of Cabarrus Arts Council.

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Charlotte Hawkins Brown

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina women’s history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit on the women of our state’s past.

Noted African-American educator and founder of the Palmer Memorial Institute, Dr. Charlotte Hawkins Brown was born in Henderson. She moved to Massachusetts with her family when she was young, but returned to North Carolina in 1901 to help educate southern blacks.

In 1902, Brown established the Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia. She named the school for Alice Freeman Palmer, a former president of Wellesley College, who was a friend and benefactor. It first operated out of an old blacksmith shop, but eventually grew to house hundreds of students in more than a dozen buildings. Palmer grew to become known as an elite black preparatory school, hosting students from all over the country and world.

During her tenure at Palmer, Brown actively toured, speaking on behalf of women’s suffrage and racial equality. She devoted her life to the improvement of the African American community’s social standing and was active in the National Council of Negro Women, an organization founded by celebrated educator Mary McLeod Bethune in 1935. As president of the North Carolina State Federation of Negro Women’s Clubs, Brown also directed African American women’s formal civic experiences for more than 20 years.

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­The Tank TeamOn what seemed like the wettest Saturday morning this year, Queen Anne’s Revenge Lab staff, East Carolina University (ECU) faculty and ECU Honors College Students met at the QAR Lab. Despite the cold and the rain all did excellent work!  We were really impressed with how everyone got stuck in with enthusiasm and efficiency whatever the task!  Two of the students were asked to be “journalists’ for the event. Below is their report on the mornings work with photos they took too. The QAR Lab staff would like to thank you all again!

Rainy Days, Spiders, and Anchors, Oh My!
By Sarah Burke and Megan Woodlief

Wet weather and chilly temperatures did little to stop a group of East Carolina University (ECU) Honors College students from participating in a service project at the QAR Lab on Saturday, February 23rd. The twenty five students split into groups after a brief tour of the facilities and assigned tasks that ranged from assisting in the preservation of artifacts to helping keep archived information organized.

The Archives TeamJackie Traish, a Music Performance and Science Education major, said she’d volunteered to come out because of her appreciation for history. “I came out to help because I wanted to be close to a piece of history. It’s amazing to see artifacts that have lasted 300 years.” Jackie was one of six students who spent their time in the lab’s warehouse working to maintain the conditions of the artifacts. Dubbing themselves the “Tank Team,” the students working in the warehouse removed and added freshwater to storage tanks, as well as returned crusted sodium bicarbonate back into full tanks. “The sodium bicarbonate helps maintain the chemistry of the water,” said Nursing major Sam Roebuck.  “It is important to keep things stable.”

Another group of students were assigned to research and received an impromptu physics lesson from Professor Kenney to aid them in the work. “We basically have to figure the best way to insulate the tank [shipping container] is,” said Applied Atmospheric Sciences major, Thomas Vaughan. “The insulation will ensure that artifacts are not exposed to extreme water temps as the weather changes throughout the year.”

Insulation Research on Honors College Day The services done by other students did not relate directly to artifact preservation, but were equally important. Biology major Adrian Modzik was assigned to the cleaning crew and helped vacuum parts of the lab. “My main job was to get rid of the spiders. There’s a BIG spider problem here.”

Martha Ervin’s group didn’t have to deal with the weather or creepy-crawlies – they were warm and dry in the office filing papers. “We actually went through all the files and switched from metal to plastic paper clips so that artifact documentation was not corroded,” said Martha, a Middle Grades Education major.

Despite the miserable weather, every student enjoyed their time spent at the QAR Lab. “We had a great time, and I hope to possibly come back and volunteer in the future,” said Hospitality Management major Megan Woodlief.

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Faculty at the Leonard Medical School, ca. 1902. Image from the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill

Faculty at the Leonard Medical School, ca. 1902. Image from the North Carolina Collection at UNC-Chapel Hill

All this month we’re bringing you stories from North Carolina’s black history. Check back here each week day for a new tidbit from our state’s African American’s past.

Often referred to as the oldest historically black institution of higher learning in the South, Shaw University was founded by Henry M. Tupper, a white minister and Union Army veteran from Massachusetts in 1865.

Etsy Hall at Shaw University ca. 1873. Image from the State Archives

Etsy Hall at Shaw University ca. 1873. Image from the State Archives

Begun as a theological class which met just north of the Capitol grounds, the school became the Shaw Collegiate Institute in 1870 after the receipt of a major gift. In 1875 the General Assembly granted a formal charter to the university.

From 1882 to 1918 Shaw operated Leonard Medical School, which, during that period, educated more than 400 African American physicians. Four other medical schools for African-Americans predated it, but Leonard was the first such school in the United States to offer a four-year graded curriculum of the sort used today. The four-year course of study was made the standard in 1893, eleven years after Leonard had instituted it.

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