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A scavenger hunt in Southport, an ice cream social in Old Fort and concerts of patriotic music throughout the state are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find across North Carolina this weekend.

To help you make the most of your limited time, here are 14 suggestions for things to check out this weekend:

1. Hear the Declaration of Independence be read by an interpreter portraying John Penn and celebrate the holiday with games, crafts and living history demonstrations Saturday at Tryon Palace in New Bern.

 

 

2. Get the most of Southport‘s widely-acclaimed Fourth of July celebration by completing a scavenger hunt offered by the N.C. Maritime Museum there.

 

 

3. Enjoy the Fourth of the July at the State Capitol in Raleigh with musical performances, military displays, a naturalization ceremony and kids’ activities.

 

 

4. Join Manteo‘s Roanoke Island Festival Park in celebrating America’s 239th birthday with fireworks and a concert by the Second Marine Aircraft Wing Band.

 

 

5. Watch a patriotic fireworks display over downtown Wilmington Saturday evening from the deck of the mighty Battleship North Carolina.

 

 

6. Honor America’s birthday at the Red, White and Bluegrass music festival in Morganton.

 

 

7. Sample some ice cream while soaking in the smooth sounds of a local bluegrass group Saturday at the Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort.

 

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8. Gather around the fire and hear stories told in the traditional mountain style, Thursday at Vance Birthplace in Weaverville.

 

 

9. Recall the great music of the Carter Family and their frequent collaborator Lesley Riddle throughout the weekend at Riddlefest in Burnsville.

 

 

10. Learn about the history of Chicamacomico Station and the U.S. Lifesaving Service during a film screening Thursday at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort.

 

 

11. Listen to patriotic tunes performed by the N.C. Symphony at concerts throughout the weekend in Wilmington, Garner and Cary.

 

 

12. Celebrate Independence Day with music, special tours and a fireworks display Saturday at Historic Halifax, the site of America’s first official cry for independence.

 

 

13. Discover the history behind the Medal of Honor and meet recipients of the award from the Wilmington area Saturday at Fort Fisher in Kure Beach.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

Schools across North Carolina and out and summer has been here officially for a week. There are so many great things to see and do over the coming up, that we decided to put together a list of 10 things that are on our agenda for the season:

1. Discover North Carolina’s rich history of film and television production at the N.C. Museum of History’s Starring, North Carolina! exhibit. The museum is running a Starring, North Carolina! summer special, with all tickets marked down 50%.

 

MoH-Summer

 

2. Try to strike it rich by panning for gold at Reed Gold Mine in Midland.

 

Reed-Summer

 

3. Take a look back at the Tar Heel vacations of yesteryear through photos and videos made available online by the State Archives. The Outer Banks History Center’s Flickr site, the Travel and Tourism Digital Collection and the State Archives’ Travel and Tourism Videos playlist are three great places to start your search.

 

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4. Stop by one of our historic sites or museums near your beach house or on the way to it.

 

Roanoke-Island-Summer

 

5. See a movie or concert under the stars at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

 

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6. Attend a summer arts or music festival or watch an outdoor drama. The N.C. Arts Council has a great list of the not-to-miss events.

 

 

7. Add a North Carolina novel or work of non-fiction to your summer reading list.

 

Reading-Summer

 

8. Check out I DO! Weddings in the Albemarle, 1831-2015, a new exhibit at the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City.

 

MoA-Summer

 

9. Beat the heat and cool off in the air conditioning at one of our nine art and history museums across the state.

 

Museums-Summer

 

10. Step aboard President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral train when it makes its only stop in the Southeast at the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer August 29 and 30.

 

NCTM-Summer

Check out the summer section of our newly-redesigned website for more tips on experiencing authentic North Carolina arts, history and culture this summer. Happy exploring!

A look at the history of surfing Beaufort, new exhibit openings in Elizabeth City and Winston-Salem and two heritage craft workshops in Pinnacle are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

Here are nine suggestions to help you make the most of your limited time:

1. Hear about the history of surfing in North Carolina during a lecture at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort Friday.

 

 

2. See a new exhibit on the history of weddings in northeastern North Carolina when it opens Saturday at the Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City.

 

 

3. Try your hand at heritage crafts at Horne Creek Farm in Pinnacle during a soap making class Thursday and a crayon workshop Saturday.

 

 

4. Kick back and listen to the music of The Eagles as performed by the N.C. Symphonyunder the stars in Cary Saturday.

 

 

5. Check out a new exhibit of watercolor and oil paintings that depict American landscapes and westward expansion when it opens Thursday at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem.

 

 

6. Join the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh for a screening of The Hundred-Foot Journeyand an Indian-French fusion dinner Saturday evening.

 

 

7. Take your kids to Tryon Palace in New Bern Saturday for a free art workshop inspired by the Fourth of July.

 

 

8.Discover the true story behind Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island during a talk at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras.

 

 

9. Spend your Saturday morning in the N.C. Museum of History’s garden in Raleigh, learning about the history of Tar Heel harvests on special tours.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

A family festival celebrating trains in Spencer, an outdoor movie and food truck rodeo in Raleigh and a 19th century-style celebration of the arrival of summer in Creswell are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend across North Carolina.

Here are 10 suggestions to help you make the most of your limited time:

1. Join the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer for its Rail Day Festival featuring special train rides, crafts and model train layouts Saturday.

 

 

2. Go back in time and celebrate the arrival of summer 19th century-style with hands-on historic activities and demonstrations, crafts and food at Somerset Place in Creswell Saturday.

 

 

3. Watch a screening of the 2014 film Chef and enjoy a food truck rodeo Saturday evening at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

 

 

4. See a quartet of the musicians from the N.C. Symphony perform at Kings in Raleigh Thursday.

 

 

5. Celebrate Father’s Day with a concert by The Baseball Project before the Winston-Salem Dash baseball game Sunday, hosted by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA).

 

 

6. Check out performances of Common Enemy, a new play centering on college basketball from Triad Stage, throughout the weekend in Greensboro.

 

 

7. Take your kids to the Museum of Albemarle in Elizabeth City Friday to let them learn what it’s like to be an archaeologist.

 

 

8. Enjoy a concert by Neko Case in the Museum Park Friday at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

 

 

9. Meet one of Pepsi’s first African American models and learn more about her interesting story Thursday at Tryon Palace in New Bern.

 

 

10. Listen to the N.C. Symphony perform the best of Broadway and the music of Harry Potter under the stars in Cary Friday and Saturday.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

From bioluminescent bays to a Benson childhood, area writers explore the interconnections of nature, place and family in volumes of poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction ideal for summer reading.

North Carolina Arts Council literature and theater director David Potorti has assembled a selection of recent books by N.C. Arts Council fellowship recipients and other North Carolinians, recently published in paperback.

1. Blue Yodel
Ansel Elkins
(Yale University Press, 2015)

In her debut collection of poetry, Greensboro resident Elkins introduces readers to a multitude of characters whose “otherness” has condemned them to live on the margins of society, inviting us to find the humanity in every person. She is a 2011–12 N.C. Arts Council fellowship recipient in the category of poetry. Blue Yodel is the 109th volume the Yale Series of Younger Poets, honoring exceptional American poets under the age of forty.

2. Phenomenal: A Hesitant Adventurer’s Search for Wonder in the Natural World 
Leigh Ann Henion
(Penguin Press, 2015)

A Boone resident and 2013–14  N.C. Arts Council literature fellowship recipient in the category of non-fiction, Henion chronicles her experience of the world’s natural phenomena — including Sweden’s aurora borealis, Tanzania’s wildebeest migration, Venezuela’s Catatumbo lightning and Puerto Rico’s bioluminescent bays — as a means to rekindle her sense of wonder and deepen her experience of parenting.

3. Land of Enchantment
Liza Wieland
(Syracuse University Press, 2015)

Arapahoe resident Wieland interweaves stories from New Mexico, Atlanta and New York City showing how art reveals the depth and complexity of human love, in all its betrayals and losses, beauty and redemption. She is a 2013–14 N.C. Arts Council Fellowship recipient in the category of fiction.

4. 27 Views of Greensboro: The Gate City in Prose & Poetry
(Eno Publishers, 2015)

27 Views of Greensboro showcases the literary life of this city as seen through the eyes of 27 hometown writers of fiction, journalism, history, poetry, and more. Contributors include Fred Chappell, Michael Parker, Ann Deagon, Maria Johnson, Ed Cone, Veronica Grossi, Lee Zacharias, Joya Wesley, Stuart Dischell, Quinn Dalton, Linda Beatrice Brown, Jeri Rowe, Allen Johnson, Jim Schlosser, Richard Zweigenhaft, Diya Abdo, Val Neiman, Logie Meachem, and others.

5. The Girl in the Road
Monica Byrne
(Broadway Books, 2015)

A 2013–14 N.C. Arts Council Fellowship recipient in the category of playwrighting, Durham resident Byrne pens her debut novel about a future world where global power has shifted east and revolution is brewing. Two women, from India and Africa, embark on vastly different, and unexpected, journeys.

6. Hotel Worthy
Valerie Nieman
(Press 53, 2015)

Greensboro resident Nieman’s second collection of poetry promises “poems of love, loss, and survival.” She is a 2013–14 N.C. Arts Council literature recipient in the category of poetry.

7. Under Magnolia: A Southern Memoir
Frances Mayes
(Broadway Books, 2015)

The author of three books about her life in Italy, Hillsborough writer Frances Mayes now revisits the turning points that defined her early years in Fitzgerald, Georgia, exploring the power of landscape, the idea of home, and the lasting force of a chaotic and loving family.

8. Amazing Place: What North Carolina Means to Writers
(UNC Press, 2015)

Authors from every region of North Carolina ruminate on the meaning of place in this collection of 21 original essays, untangling North Carolina’s influence on their work, exploring how the idea of place resonates with North Carolinians, and illuminating why the state itself plays such a significant role in its own literature. Contributors include Belle Boggs, Marianne Gingher, Stephanie Griest, Jill McCorkle, Michael McFee, Michael Parker, Bland Simpson and Lee Smith.

9. Steal Away
Shelby Stephenson
(Jacar Press, 2014)

An intimate, tender and lyrical chapbook that looks back at a childhood where friendship, family, and slavery intersect. These poems ponder the conflicted emotions, from joy to sorrow, that come from meditating on one’s legacy. Stephenson, a Benson resident, is the current Poet Laureate of North Carolina.

10. The Petals of Your Eyes
Aimee Parkison
(Starcherone Books, 2014)

An eerie  tale of modern-day kidnapping and slavery by Charlotte resident Parkison, a 2013–14 N.C. Arts Council literature fellowship recipient in the category of fiction.

11. Falling Into Place
Catherine Reid
(Beacon Press, 2014)

A 2013–14 N.C. Arts Council fellowship recipient in the category of non-fiction, Asheville resident Reid explores insights into how the mysteries of nature are interwoven with those of family and community.

12. The Life of the World to Come
Joseph Bathanti
(University of South Carolina Press, 2014)

George Dolce aspires to leave his blue collar, Catholic neighborhood in 1970s Pittsburgh to attend law school, but his involvement with a local gambling ring threatens his plans, and ultimately, his life. Escaping to North Carolina, he meets a mysterious woman who joins him in the task of reconciling his past and avoiding his punishment. Vilas resident Bathanti was awarded N.C. Arts Council fellowships in the categories of poetry (1995–96) and fiction (2009–10) and served as the poet laureate of North Carolina from 2012 to 2014.

13. An Infuriating American: The Incendiary Arts of H. L. Mencken
Hal Crowther
(Muse Books, 2014)

Mencken, the belligerent newspaperman from Baltimore, was considered by many to be the most powerful individual journalist of the 20th century. Hillsborough resident Crowther, who followed in Mencken’s footsteps as a reporter, magazine editor, literary critic, and political columnist, paints a picture of the pundit and how he came to be such an outrageous original.

14. Deadliest of Sins
Sallie Bissell
(Midnight Ink, 2014)

Asheville author Sallie Bissell’s latest Mary Crow mystery takes place in Campbell County, North Carolina, where a recent murder and a preacher could be linked in a conspiracy.

Still looking for more suggestions? The Read North Carolina Novels blog from UNC-Chapel Hill and the North Carolina Literary Map from UNC-Greensboro and the State Library are two great places to start.

Don’t forget as well that public libraries across North Carolina will be offering summer reading programs for adults and kids alike.

What will you bee reading this summer? Tell us in the comments.

A celebration of the State Capitol’s 175th birthday in Raleigh, a pirate-themed day of family fun in Southport and the chance to strike it rich in Midland are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend across North Carolina.

Here are 16 suggestions to help you make the most of your limited time:

1. Celebrate the State Capitol’s 175th birthday in Raleigh Saturday with music, food, living history demonstrations and kids’ activities during the day and a barbecue and bluegrass dinner in the evening.

 

 

 

 

3. Try to strike it rich Saturday at Reed Gold Mine’s pan-o-lympics in Midland.

 

 

4. Sail in a traditional wooden boat, cast a line with a cane pole, join in games or just relax and enjoy the music and spectacular view at the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort‘s Maritime Day Saturday.

 

 

5. Discuss Thomas Wolfe’s short story “Boom Town” with a local author Thursday at the Thomas Wolfe Memorial in Asheville.

 

 

6. Enjoy pirate movies, crazy characters and a scavenger hunt around town as part of the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport‘s pirate-themed family day Saturday.

 

 

7. Catch a movie at museums across the state. The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) in Winston-Salem will be showing Double Indemnity Thursday, and inRaleigh, the N.C. Museum of History will have Blue Velvet on Friday, while the N.C. Museum of Art will screen The Imitation Game under the stars Saturday.

 

 

8. Dance along to the folk rock sound of Brandi Carlisle when she performs Friday at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh.

 

 

9. Hear some of the best jazz music North Carolina has to offer during concerts at Tryon Palace in New Bern Friday and the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh Sunday.

 

 

10. Learn about daily life aboard the Battleship North Carolina, now anchored in Wilmington, from volunteers stationed throughout the ship Saturday.

 

 

11. See fire trucks from throughout history at the N.C. Transportation Museum in Spencer Saturday.

 

 

12. Celebrate 19th century farm life Saturday in Fremont, when Aycock Birthplace showcases historic beekeeping, gardening and farm equipment.

 

 

13. Dive deep into the history of gardens and make a garden-themed craft to take home Saturday at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh.

 

 

14. Join Vance Birthplace for a Civil War encampment complete with lectures, military drills and firing demonstrations Saturday and Sunday in Weaverville.

 

 

15. Listen to the North Carolina Symphony perform music by Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky and other Russian greats during two distinct concerts Friday and Saturday in Cary.

 

 

16. Marvel at performances by the world-renowned group Shen Wei Dance Arts in Durham Thursday, Friday and Saturday as part of American Dance Festival’s opening weekend.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

An Olympics of Native American games in Mount Gilead, a family festival celebrating gold in Old Fort and free concerts by the North Carolina Symphony around the state are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find across North Carolina this weekend.

Here are nine suggestions to help you make the most of your limited time:

1. Try your hand at a whole host of traditional Native American games Saturday at Town Creek Indian Mound’s first annual Archaeolympic Games in Mount Gilead.

 

 

2. Hear some of the best light classical pieces of music as performed by the N.C. Symphony at free concerts in Tarboro Thursday, Chapel Hill Friday and Jacksonville Sunday.

 

 

3. Enjoy music by some of the state’s best old-time musicians at the Mount Airy Bluegrass and Old-Time Fiddlers’ Convention Friday and Saturday in Mount Airy.

 

 

4. Celebrate North Carolina’s rich history of gold mining Friday and Saturday at the Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort with mining demonstrations, gold panning, gem stone screenings, the chance to meet renowned gold experts, children’s games, prizes, music and food.

 

 

5. Bring a blanket to Vance Birthplace in Weaverville for an evening of campfire storytelling Thursday.

 

 

6. Watch a movie under the stars at the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh. The museum will be showing Dazed and Confused Friday and the sing-along version of Frozen Saturday.

 

 

7. Explore the North Carolina History Center at Tryon Palace with your kids after dark Thursday in New Bern.

 

 

8. Check out a new small case exhibit highlighting the history of funk music in North Carolina, opening at the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh Saturday.

 

 

9. Join the North Carolina Symphony for a concert of the hits from the 80s Saturday in Cary.

 

 

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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