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Try your hand at tobacco tying Saturday at Duke Homestead’s
Harvest and Hornworm Festival

A celebration of the harvest in Durham, musket and cannon fire in Statesville and the words of Thomas Wolfe intertwined with mountain music in Asheville are just a few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The weekend kicks off Friday when the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will celebrate the end of summer with live music, gourmet popsicles and champagne, while the N.C. Museum of History, also in Raleigh, will kick off its Starring North Carolina film series byshowing Bull Durham. Also Friday, the popular Cedars in the Pines exhibit exploring Lebanese life in North Carolina will open at Tryon Palace in New Bern.

Saturday in Raleigh, staff from the State Library will celebrate Tar Heel history by telling some of its stranger stories through panel discussions and activities for kids at the N.C. Museum of History. At the same time, the Museum of History will help kids make a critter-themed craft and teach them about the boll weevil bug and its effect on agriculture, while the N.C. Museum of Art will help kids and families make a one-of-a-kind journal before taking them on a journey through the Museum Park. In Durham, Duke Homestead will celebrate the arrival of fall with demonstrations of historic tobacco harvesting, stringing and curing, kids activities, food and live music.

New Bern‘s Tryon Palace will let kids see what school was like during the 1800s before hosting local jewelry artist Alice Bilello for demonstrations of her craft and displaying sculpture throughout the N.C. History Center as part of New Bern’s city-wide ArtWalk. Elsewhere in the east, Historic Edenton will offer a yoga class on the picturesque lawn of the 1767 Chowan Courthouse and the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport will put on bicycle tours highlighting the history of its hometown.

The Thomas Wolfe Memorial in Asheville will feature recitations of Thomas Wolfe’s work against the backdrop of mountain music by some of the region’s best artists including fiddler Bobby Hicks and vocalist Doc Cudd.

The weekend wraps up Sunday when the N.C. Museum of History features the smooth bluegrass sounds of Asheville duo Grits and Soul in its Raleigh garden.

Throughout the weekend, musket and cannon fire will light up Statesville for Fort Dobbs’Living History Weekend, while the N.C. Museum of Art will host performances by the award-winning troupe Paperhand Puppet Intervention in Raleigh.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

Secretary Kluttz and N.C. Museum of History Director Ken Howard inside at the Cedars in the Pines on the Plaza festival

Secretary Kluttz and N.C. Museum of History Director Ken Howard
inside at the Cedars in the Pines on the Plaza festival

When you think of immigrants to North Carolina, you might think of the Scotch-Irish in the Sandhills, the Swiss around New Bern or the Moravians in the Triad. Chances are the Lebanese might not be near the top of your list. But earlier this month, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz got a taste (literally!) of the deep roots of the Lebanese community in North Carolina at the N.C. Museum of History’s Cedars in Pines on the Plaza festival.

The event celebrated the long legacy of the Lebanese in Tar Heel State. The Cedar in the Pines exhibit that the event is tied to explores how the group has changed and been changed by North Carolina since its members began to arrive here around 1880.

While at the festival, the Secretary sampled some the finest local Lebanese food and watched displays of Lebanese-American music and dance. Crafts, henna hand painting, Arabic calligraphy, a scavenger hunt were some of the activities that  rounded out the day.

If you missed the festival, have no fear! The exhibit will  go on view at Tryon Palace in New Bern between September 12 and December 14.

Sec. Kluttz, Gov. McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler accept the grant check from SECU Foundation Chariman McKinley Wooten and SECU Foundation Executive Director Mark Twisdale

Sec. Kluttz, Gov. McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler accept
the grant check from SECU Foundation Chariman McKinley Wooten and
SECU Foundation Executive Director Mark Twisdale

The N.C. Museum of Art’s (NCMA) education program has long been celebrated as one of the best in the country, but thanks to a new $1.9 million grant from the SECU Foundation, it’s about to get even better.

The grant will be used to extend the Museum’s art education outreach through the establishment of a vibrant, state-of-the-art Education Center that will become the portal for accessing the Museum’s world class collections of art, special exhibitions and educational programs both on-site and virtually throughout North Carolina. Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined Governor Pat McCrory and NCMA Director Larry Wheeler in accepting the grant from SECU Foundation Board Chair McKinley Wooten earlier this summer.

Construction is expected to begin in the Spring of 2015 for an inventive auditorium, adjacent studio, classrooms and distance learning center; all equipped with the latest technology, but you can connect with NCMA’s first-class educational resources today. The ArtNC website and kids and families calendar are two great places to start interacting with NCMA’s innovative art offerings.

Celebrate colonial history with militia demonstrations, games and hands on activities for the entire family Saturday at the Museum of the Cape Fear

Colonial music, games and activities in Fayetteville, a gathering of diving and archaeology experts in Hatteras and a celebration of The Big Lebowski in Raleigh are just of the few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The fun starts Thursday when the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras will screen a documentary on the exploration of the Titanic shipwreck.

Friday the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will give visitors the chance to chat with the artists featured in its new Line, Touch, Trace exhibition before showing the critically-acclaimed film The Grand Budapest Hotel under the stars.

Saturday will start off with colonial era music, games, militia drills and hands-on activities at the Museum of Cape Fear’s Festival of Yesteryear in Fayetteville. At the coast, Historic Bath will host an expert on the town’s St. Thomas Church for a lecture and tour, while the N.C. Maritime Museum in Southport offers a special scavenger hunt for National Grandparents Day. Both Town Creek Indian Mound in Mount Gilead and the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh will celebrate Grandparents Day, too.

If art is more what you’re looking for, then Raleigh‘s your town. The N.C. Museum of History will offer a photography workshop with award-winning photographer Brenda Scott, while the N.C. Museum of Art will host two rounds of its Meet Your Museum tours and put on its second annual The Big Lebowski Dudes Abide Festival complete with food trucks, outdoor activities and, of course, a screening of the cult classic film.

Throughout the weekend, the Graveyard of Atlantic Museum in Hatteras will bring together the state and country’s leading experts on diving and underwater archaeology for a series of lectures and presentations that are free and open to the public.

North Carolina also has two great arts festivals going on this weekend. More than 140 will descend on downtown Raleigh for the 5th annual Hopscotch Music Festival, while Winston-Salem will host James Patterson, Rita Mae Brown and other national authors for the Bookmarks Festival of Books and Authors.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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A scenic view at Historic Bath

Late last month, Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz made her first visit to North Carolina’s first town, Bath.

While visiting the quaint Beaufort County town, the Secretary attended a meeting of the Historic Bath Commission, led by chairperson Peggy Daw, and toured Historic Bath State Historic Site—which the commission helps the department maintain. While at the meeting, Secretary Kluttz emphasized the invaluable service that the commission members provide and shared how she has tried to the spread the word about the importance of history to our state’s economy and quality of life during her tenure.

Secretary Kluttz next to the Palmer-Marsh House at Historic Bath

Secretary Kluttz next to the Palmer-Marsh House at Historic Bath

On the tour, Secretary Kluttz enjoyed Bath’s picturesque views, especially the spot where Back Creek flows into the Pamlico River and the front porch of the 1830 Bonner House. She also was able to see the popular Queen Anne’s Revenge: 1718 exhibit in the town where Blackbeard once lived.

Though Secretary Kluttz didn’t quite have the time to give the beautiful site the full tour that it deserves, the Secretary promised Site Manager Leigh Swain that her first visit to North Carolina’s first town wouldn’t be her last.

Historic Bath hosts a spectacular Christmas Open House during the holiday season, but there are plenty of reasons for you to visit, including daily tours of the site’s many historic buildings, before then.

Secretary Kluttz and Town Creek Indian Mound Site Manager Rich Thompson climb the mound at the Town Creek Indian Mound

Secretary Kluttz and Town Creek Indian Mound Site Manager Rich Thompson climb the mound at the Town Creek Indian Mound

There aren’t many places in North Carolina—or the country, even—where you can see the power of archaeology more than at Town Creek Indian Mound in Montgomery County.

Archaeologists led by UNC’s Dr. Joffre Coe began working on the site in the late 1930s, and it’s through Coe’s lifelong commitment to the area and to Native American archaeology that Town Creek was able to open as North Carolina’s first state historic site in 1955. It’s also because of Coe’s efforts that the site now has reconstructed buildings that show what the area would have been like for the Pee Dee civilization thousands of years ago.

Secretary Kluttz helps cut the cake for Dr. Coe's birthday birthday party

Secretary Kluttz helps cut the cake for Dr. Coe’s birthday birthday party

Cultural Resources Secretary Susan Kluttz joined site staff and dozens from the community last month to celebrate what would’ve been Coe’s 98th birthday if he was still alive. After cutting a cake and enjoying a piece with local scout and 4-H groups, the Secretary toured this unique site. She especially enjoyed seeing the cutaway walls which many of the buildings have to help visitors see how the Pee Dee Indians would’ve originally built them.

One of the most exciting discoveries that Secretary Kluttz learned of while at Town Creek is that the work isn’t finished yet. Researchers from North Carolina universities are still excavating areas of the site, and they‘ve just recently uncovered some new buildings.

If you haven’t yet been, Town Creek Indian Mound is certainly worth a visit. Located about an hour and half from Raleigh, Fayetteville, the Triad and Charlotte, the site is an easy drive from just about anywhere in Piedmont.

Join Tryon Palace Saturday for the re-enactment of a duel of historical proportions.

A new exhibition of drawings in Raleigh, a kayak tour of the Crystal Coast in Beaufort and a smoke-filled duel reenacment in New Bern are just of few of the opportunities for fun and discovery you’ll find this weekend with the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources.

The weekend kicks off Thursday when the staff from the N.C. Museum of History in Raleigh will read kids a tall tale after taking a short tour of one of the museum’s wonderful galleries. At the coast, the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort will lead a kayak tour highlighting the beautiful nature and fascinating history of the area, before the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras hosts a local duck decoy craftsmen for demonstrations of his trade.

Friday, the N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh will be open late for visitors to browse its galleries after dark with the smooth jazz stylings of Peter Lamb and the Wolves in the background.

Gun smoke will fill the air Saturday morning at Tryon Palace in New Bern as the site reenacts the famed, lethal duel between political rivals John Stanly and Richard Dobbs Spaight, before Historic Stagville in Durham teaches visitors the cooking techniques that enslaved African Americans once used. The N.C. Museum of Art will screen the award-winning drama 12 Years a Slave in its Museum Park Saturday evening.

This weekend is your last chance to check out the popular Bull City Summer exhibition at the N.C. Museum of Art and the Cedars in the Pines exhibit at the N.C. Museum of History. This weekend is also your first chance to see Line, Touch, Trace at the N.C. Museum of Art, which features drawings by 13 contemporary North Carolina artists.

Though most of our historic sites and museums are closed for the Labor Day holiday Monday, Tryon Palace in New Bern, Roanoke Island Festival Park in Manteo and theBattleship North Carolina in Wilmington will all be open for business.

Check out DCR’s calendar for more information on these and other events, and a enjoy a great North Carolina weekend!

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